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Social/economic costs and quality of life in patients with haemophilia in Europe

Overview of attention for article published in The European Journal of Health Economics, April 2016
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Title
Social/economic costs and quality of life in patients with haemophilia in Europe
Published in
The European Journal of Health Economics, April 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10198-016-0785-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marianna Cavazza, Yllka Kodra, Patrizio Armeni, Marta De Santis, Julio López-Bastida, Renata Linertová, Juan Oliva-Moreno, Pedro Serrano-Aguilar, Manuel Posada-de-la-Paz, Domenica Taruscio, Arrigo Schieppati, Georgi Iskrov, László Gulácsi, Johann Matthias Graf von der Schulenburg, Panos Kanavos, Karine Chevreul, Ulf Persson, Giovanni Fattore

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine the economic burden from a societal perspective and the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of patients with haemophilia in Europe. We conducted a cross-sectional study of patients with haemophilia from Bulgaria, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Spain Sweden and the UK. Data on demographic characteristics, health resource utilisation, informal care, loss of labour productivity and HRQOL were collected from the questionnaires completed by patients or their caregivers. HRQOL was measured with the EuroQol 5-domain (EQ-5D) questionnaire. The costs have been estimated from a societal perspective adopting a bottom-up approach. A total of 401 questionnaires were included in the study, of which 339 were collected from patients with haemophilia and 62 from caregivers. The lowest average annual cost per person was reported in Bulgaria (€6,660) and the highest in Germany (€194,490). Our results demonstrate both a large difference from country to country in the average annual cost per patient in 2012 and the driving role of drugs in costs. Drugs represent nearly 90 % of direct healthcare costs in a majority of the countries analysed (Hungary, Italy, Spain and Germany). In Bulgaria, France and Sweden, however, healthcare services (visits, tests and hospitalisations) prevail. Costs are also shown to differ between children and adults. The mean EQ-5D index score for adult patients was 0.69 and mean EQ-5D VAS was 66.6. The mean EQ-5D index score for carers was 0.87 and mean EQ-5D VAS was 75.5. In the disability score, 60 % showed no disability and measuring caregiver burden with the Zarit Index produced an overall mean score of 25.3. We have shown that haemophilia is associated with a substantial economic burden and impaired HRQOL. Studies on cost of illness and HRQOL are important for haemophilia as the future of this disease is likely to change with the development of new innovative treatments. The introduction of these treatments will most likely impact future costs related to haemophilia.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 67 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 21%
Researcher 13 19%
Unspecified 12 18%
Other 8 12%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Other 14 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 18 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 21%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 12 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 7%
Other 12 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 April 2016.
All research outputs
#9,992,688
of 12,484,531 outputs
Outputs from The European Journal of Health Economics
#583
of 742 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#186,748
of 266,872 outputs
Outputs of similar age from The European Journal of Health Economics
#45
of 48 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.