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Leakage decrease detected by dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI predicts survival in recurrent glioblastoma treated with bevacizumab

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical and Translational Oncology, March 2016
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Title
Leakage decrease detected by dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI predicts survival in recurrent glioblastoma treated with bevacizumab
Published in
Clinical and Translational Oncology, March 2016
DOI 10.1007/s12094-016-1502-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. Hilario, J. M. Sepulveda, A. Hernandez-Lain, E. Salvador, L. Koren, R. Manneh, Y. Ruano, A. Perez-Nuñez, A. Lagares, A. Ramos

Abstract

In glioblastoma, tumor progression appears to be triggered by expression of VEGF, a regulator of blood vessel permeability. Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody that inhibits angiogenesis by clearing circulating VEGF, resulting in a decline in the contrast-enhancing tumor, which does not always correlate with treatment response. Our objectives were: (1) to evaluate whether changes in DSC perfusion MRI-derived leakage could predict survival in recurrent glioblastoma, and (2) to estimate whether leakage at baseline was related to treatment outcome. We retrospectively analyzed DSC perfusion MRI in 24 recurrent glioblastomas treated with bevacizumab as second line chemotherapy. Leakage at baseline and changes in maximum leakage between baseline and the first follow-up after treatment were selected for quantitative analysis. Survival univariate analysis was made constructing survival curves using Kaplan-Meier method and comparing subgroups by log rank probability test. Leakage reduction at 8 weeks after initiation of bevacizumab treatment had a significant influence on overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Median OS and PFS were 2.4 and 2.8 months longer for patients with leakage reduction at the first follow-up. Higher leakage at baseline was associated with leakage reduction after treatment. Odds ratio of treatment response was 9 for patients with maximum leakage at baseline >5. Leakage decrease may predict OS and PFS in recurrent glioblastomas treated with bevacizumab. Leakage reduction postulates as a potential biomarker for treatment response evaluation. Leakage at baseline seems to predict response to treatment, but was not independently associated with survival.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 25%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 17%
Researcher 1 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 58%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 17%
Unspecified 2 17%
Neuroscience 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 March 2016.
All research outputs
#11,577,780
of 13,029,986 outputs
Outputs from Clinical and Translational Oncology
#503
of 653 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#221,910
of 264,758 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical and Translational Oncology
#17
of 23 outputs
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