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A comparative phylogenetic study of genetics and folk music

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Genetics & Genomics, March 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#9 of 992)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
32 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
A comparative phylogenetic study of genetics and folk music
Published in
Molecular Genetics & Genomics, March 2012
DOI 10.1007/s00438-012-0683-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Horolma Pamjav, Zoltán Juhász, Andrea Zalán, Endre Németh, Bayarlkhagva Damdin

Abstract

Computer-aided comparison of folk music from different nations is one of the newest research areas. We were intrigued to have identified some important similarities between phylogenetic studies and modern folk music. First of all, both of them use similar concepts and representation tools such as multidimensional scaling for modelling relationship between populations. This gave us the idea to investigate whether these connections are merely accidental or if they mirror population migrations from the past. We raised the question; does the complex structure of musical connections display a clear picture and can this system be interpreted by the genetic analysis? This study is the first to systematically investigate the incidental genetic background of the folk music context between different populations. Paternal (42 populations) and maternal lineages (56 populations) were compared based on Fst genetic distances of the Y chromosomal and mtDNA haplogroup frequencies. To test this hypothesis, the corresponding musical cultures were also compared using an automatic overlap analysis of parallel melody styles for 31 Eurasian nations. We found that close musical relations of populations indicate close genetic distances (<0.05) with a probability of 82%. It was observed that there is a significant correlation between population genetics and folk music; maternal lineages have a more important role in folk music traditions than paternal lineages. Furthermore, the combination of these disciplines establishing a new interdisciplinary research field of "music-genetics" can be an efficient tool to get a more comprehensive picture on the complex behaviour of populations in prehistoric time.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Hungary 1 3%
Unknown 30 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 28%
Researcher 9 28%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 9%
Student > Bachelor 3 9%
Student > Master 2 6%
Other 6 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 34%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 19%
Psychology 4 13%
Unspecified 2 6%
Arts and Humanities 2 6%
Other 7 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 January 2016.
All research outputs
#864,490
of 12,217,320 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Genetics & Genomics
#9
of 992 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,498
of 111,838 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Genetics & Genomics
#2
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,217,320 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 992 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 111,838 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.