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Bonobos apparently search for a lost member injured by a snare

Overview of attention for article published in Primates, February 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#36 of 534)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
22 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
44 Mendeley
Title
Bonobos apparently search for a lost member injured by a snare
Published in
Primates, February 2012
DOI 10.1007/s10329-012-0298-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nahoko Tokuyama, Besao Emikey, Batuafe Bafike, Batuafe Isolumbo, Bahanande Iyokango, Mbangi N. Mulavwa, Takeshi Furuichi

Abstract

This is the first report to demonstrate that a large mixed-sex party of bonobos travelled a long distance to return to the location of a snare apparently to search for a member that had been caught in it. An adult male was caught in a metallic snare in a swamp forest at Wamba, Luo Scientific Reserve, Democratic Republic of the Congo. After he escaped from the snare by breaking a sapling to which the snare was attached, other members of his party assisted him by unfastening the snare from lianas in which it was caught and licked his wound and tried to remove the snare from his fingers. In the late afternoon, they left him in the place where he was stuck in the liana and travelled to the dry forest where they usually spend the night. The next morning, they travelled back 1.8 km to revisit the location of the injured male. When they confirmed that he was no longer there, they returned to the dry forest to forage. This was unlike the usual ranging patterns of the party, suggesting that the bonobos travelled with the specific intention of searching for this injured individual who had been left behind. The incident described in this report likely occurred because bonobos usually range in a large mixed-sex party and try to maintain group cohesion as much as possible.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 22 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 2 5%
Kenya 1 2%
Unknown 41 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 30%
Student > Master 9 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 9%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Other 7 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 52%
Psychology 6 14%
Environmental Science 5 11%
Unspecified 5 11%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Other 3 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 27. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 December 2012.
All research outputs
#434,424
of 11,335,597 outputs
Outputs from Primates
#36
of 534 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,410
of 104,274 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Primates
#1
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,335,597 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 534 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 104,274 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them