↓ Skip to main content

Impact of cardiac reverse remodeling after cardiac resynchronization therapy assessed by myocardial perfusion imaging on ventricular arrhythmia

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Nuclear Cardiology, March 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
8 Mendeley
Title
Impact of cardiac reverse remodeling after cardiac resynchronization therapy assessed by myocardial perfusion imaging on ventricular arrhythmia
Published in
Journal of Nuclear Cardiology, March 2016
DOI 10.1007/s12350-016-0447-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kuo-Feng Chiang, Guang-Uei Hung, Shih-Chung Tsai, Chien-Ming Cheng, Yu-Cheng Chang, Wan-Yu Lin, Yu-Cheng Hsieh, Tsu-Juey Wu, Shih-Ann Chen, Jin-Long Huang, Ying-Chieh Liao, Ji Chen

Abstract

Although cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has been a useful treatment of heart failure, patients with CRT are still in risk of sudden cardiac death due to ventricular arrhythmia. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of cardiac reverse remodeling after CRT on the prevalence of ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation (VT/VF). Forty-one heart failure patients (26 men, age 66 ± 10 years), who were implanted with CRT for at least 12 months, were enrolled. All patients received myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) under CRT pacing to evaluate left ventricle (LV) function, dyssynchrony, and scar. VT/VF episodes during the follow-up period after MPI were recorded by the CRT devices. Sixteen patients (N = 16/41, 39%) were found to have VT/VF. Multivariate Cox regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that five risk factors were significant predictors of VT/VF, including increased left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) by ≤7% after CRT, low LVEF after CRT (≤30%), change of intrinsic QRS duration (iQRSd) by ≤7 ms, wide iQRSd after CRT (≥121 ms), and high systolic dyssynchrony after CRT (phase standard deviation ≥45.6°). For those patients with all of the 5 risk factors, 85.7% or more developed VT/VF. The characteristics of cardiac reverse remodeling after CRT as assessed by MPI are associated with the prevalence of ventricular arrhythmia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 2 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 25%
Student > Postgraduate 1 13%
Student > Master 1 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 13%
Other 1 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 50%
Unspecified 2 25%
Psychology 1 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 March 2016.
All research outputs
#6,857,514
of 12,199,521 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Nuclear Cardiology
#405
of 1,101 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#139,922
of 310,165 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Nuclear Cardiology
#22
of 53 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,199,521 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,101 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 310,165 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 53 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.