↓ Skip to main content

When is a forest a forest? Forest concepts and definitions in the era of forest and landscape restoration

Overview of attention for article published in Ambio: A Journal of the Human Environment, March 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#1 of 990)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
95 tweeters
facebook
20 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
135 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
910 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
When is a forest a forest? Forest concepts and definitions in the era of forest and landscape restoration
Published in
Ambio: A Journal of the Human Environment, March 2016
DOI 10.1007/s13280-016-0772-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robin L. Chazdon, Pedro H. S. Brancalion, Lars Laestadius, Aoife Bennett-Curry, Kathleen Buckingham, Chetan Kumar, Julian Moll-Rocek, Ima Célia Guimarães Vieira, Sarah Jane Wilson

Abstract

We present a historical overview of forest concepts and definitions, linking these changes with distinct perspectives and management objectives. Policies dealing with a broad range of forest issues are often based on definitions created for the purpose of assessing global forest stocks, which do not distinguish between natural and planted forests or reforests, and which have not proved useful in assessing national and global rates of forest regrowth and restoration. Implementing and monitoring forest and landscape restoration requires additional approaches to defining and assessing forests that reveal the qualities and trajectories of forest patches in a spatially and temporally dynamic landscape matrix. New technologies and participatory assessment of forest states and trajectories offer the potential to operationalize such definitions. Purpose-built and contextualized definitions are needed to support policies that successfully protect, sustain, and regrow forests at national and global scales. We provide a framework to illustrate how different management objectives drive the relative importance of different aspects of forest state, dynamics, and landscape context.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 95 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 910 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 20 2%
United Kingdom 5 <1%
Portugal 2 <1%
United States 2 <1%
Colombia 2 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Ecuador 1 <1%
Other 6 <1%
Unknown 869 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 194 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 169 19%
Researcher 163 18%
Student > Bachelor 79 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 61 7%
Other 154 17%
Unknown 90 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 335 37%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 303 33%
Social Sciences 47 5%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 44 5%
Engineering 17 2%
Other 37 4%
Unknown 127 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 155. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 December 2019.
All research outputs
#98,635
of 14,022,239 outputs
Outputs from Ambio: A Journal of the Human Environment
#1
of 990 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,493
of 266,662 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ambio: A Journal of the Human Environment
#1
of 36 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,022,239 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 990 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,662 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 36 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.