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Head Impact Exposure in Youth Football

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of Biomedical Engineering, February 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#6 of 1,340)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
14 tweeters
patent
1 patent
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
117 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
187 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Head Impact Exposure in Youth Football
Published in
Annals of Biomedical Engineering, February 2012
DOI 10.1007/s10439-012-0530-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ray W. Daniel, Steven Rowson, Stefan M. Duma

Abstract

The head impact exposure for athletes involved in football at the college and high school levels has been well documented; however, the head impact exposure of the youth population involved with football has yet to be investigated, despite its dramatically larger population. The objective of this study was to investigate the head impact exposure in youth football. Impacts were monitored using a custom 12 accelerometer array equipped inside the helmets of seven players aged 7-8 years old during each game and practice for an entire season. A total of 748 impacts were collected from the 7 participating players during the season, with an average of 107 impacts per player. Linear accelerations ranged from 10 to 100 g, and the rotational accelerations ranged from 52 to 7694 rad/s(2). The majority of the high level impacts occurred during practices, with 29 of the 38 impacts above 40 g occurring in practices. Although less frequent, youth football can produce high head accelerations in the range of concussion causing impacts measured in adults. In order to minimize these most severe head impacts, youth football practices should be modified to eliminate high impact drills that do not replicate the game situations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 187 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 2%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 180 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 32 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 15%
Student > Master 28 15%
Student > Bachelor 26 14%
Unspecified 18 10%
Other 55 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 41 22%
Engineering 38 20%
Unspecified 28 15%
Sports and Recreations 19 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 10%
Other 43 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 107. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 January 2019.
All research outputs
#141,705
of 13,272,830 outputs
Outputs from Annals of Biomedical Engineering
#6
of 1,340 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#848
of 119,387 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of Biomedical Engineering
#1
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,272,830 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,340 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 119,387 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.