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Classifying Autism Spectrum Disorders by ADI-R: Subtypes or Severity Gradient?

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
10 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
53 Mendeley
Title
Classifying Autism Spectrum Disorders by ADI-R: Subtypes or Severity Gradient?
Published in
Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, March 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10803-016-2760-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hannah Cholemkery, Juliane Medda, Thomas Lempp, Christine M. Freitag

Abstract

To reduce phenotypic heterogeneity of Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and add to the current diagnostic discussion this study aimed at identifying clinically meaningful ASD subgroups. Cluster analyses were used to describe empirically derived groups based on the Autism Diagnostic Interview-revised (ADI-R) in a large sample of n = 463 individuals with ASD aged 3-21. Three clusters were observed. Most severely affected individuals regarding all core symptoms were allocated to cluster 2. Cluster 3 comprised moderate symptom severity of social communication impairments (SCI) and less stereotyped repetitive behavior (RRB). Minor SCI and relatively more RRB characterized cluster 1. This study offers support for both, a symptom profile, and a gradient model of ASD within the spectrum due to the sample included.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 2%
France 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 50 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 30%
Researcher 7 13%
Unspecified 7 13%
Student > Master 7 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 11%
Other 10 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 23 43%
Unspecified 7 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 11%
Social Sciences 4 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Other 11 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 March 2016.
All research outputs
#2,706,667
of 12,316,253 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders
#1,248
of 3,051 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#68,756
of 284,831 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders
#53
of 118 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,316,253 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,051 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,831 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 118 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.