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Antarctic skuas recognize individual humans

Overview of attention for article published in Animal Cognition, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#10 of 972)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
40 news outlets
blogs
8 blogs
twitter
46 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
22 Mendeley
Title
Antarctic skuas recognize individual humans
Published in
Animal Cognition, March 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10071-016-0970-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Won Young Lee, Yeong-Deok Han, Sang-im Lee, Piotr G. Jablonski, Jin-Woo Jung, Jeong-Hoon Kim

Abstract

Recent findings report that wild animals can recognize individual humans. To explain how the animals distinguish humans, two hypotheses are proposed. The high cognitive abilities hypothesis implies that pre-existing high intelligence enabled animals to acquire such abilities. The pre-exposure to stimuli hypothesis suggests that frequent encounters with humans promote the acquisition of discriminatory abilities in these species. Here, we examine individual human recognition abilities in a wild Antarctic species, the brown skua (Stercorarius antarcticus), which lives away from typical human settlements and was only recently exposed to humans due to activities at Antarctic stations. We found that, as nest visits were repeated, the skua parents responded at further distances and were more likely to attack the nest intruder. Also, we demonstrated that seven out of seven breeding pairs of skuas selectively responded to a human nest intruder with aggression and ignored a neutral human who had not previously approached the nest. The results indicate that Antarctic skuas, a species that typically inhabited in human-free areas, are able to recognize individual humans who disturbed their nests. Our findings generally support the high cognitive abilities hypothesis, but this ability can be acquired during a relatively short period in the life of an individual as a result of interactions between individual birds and humans.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 46 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 5%
Austria 1 5%
Unknown 20 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 18%
Researcher 3 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 14%
Unspecified 2 9%
Other 5 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 32%
Unspecified 7 32%
Environmental Science 3 14%
Neuroscience 2 9%
Psychology 2 9%
Other 1 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 392. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 January 2019.
All research outputs
#25,449
of 13,187,783 outputs
Outputs from Animal Cognition
#10
of 972 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#966
of 267,659 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Animal Cognition
#1
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,187,783 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 972 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,659 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.