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Early-phase muscular adaptations in response to slow-speed versus traditional resistance-training regimens

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, February 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
18 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
video
11 video uploaders

Citations

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41 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
216 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Early-phase muscular adaptations in response to slow-speed versus traditional resistance-training regimens
Published in
European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, February 2012
DOI 10.1007/s00421-012-2339-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mark D. Schuenke, Jennifer R. Herman, Roger M. Gliders, Fredrick C. Hagerman, Robert S. Hikida, Sharon R. Rana, Kerry E. Ragg, Robert S. Staron

Abstract

Thirty-four untrained women participated in a 6-week program to investigate slow-speed versus "normal" speed resistance-training protocols. Subjects were divided into: slow-speed (SS), normal-speed/traditional-strength (TS), normal-speed/traditional muscular endurance (TE), and non-exercising control (C) groups. Leg press, squats, and knee extensions were performed 2 days/week for the first week and 3 days/week for the remaining 5 weeks (~2 min rest). The SS group performed 6-10 repetitions maximum (6-10RM) for each set with 10 s concentric (con) and 4 s eccentric (ecc) contractions. The TS and TE groups performed sets of 6-10RM and 20-30RM, respectively, at "normal" speed (1-2 s/con and ecc contractions). TE and SS trained at the same relative intensity (~40-60% 1RM), whereas TS trained at ~80-85% 1RM. Pre- and post-training muscle biopsies were analyzed for fiber-type composition, cross-sectional area (CSA), and myosin heavy chain (MHC) content. The percentage of type IIX fibers decreased and IIAX increased in all three training groups. However, only TS showed an increase in percentage of type IIA fibers. CSA of fiber types I, IIA, and IIX increased in TS. In SS, only the CSA of IIA and IIX fibers increased. These changes were supported by MHC data. No significant changes for any parameters were found for the C group. In conclusion, slow-speed strength training induced a greater adaptive response compared to training with a similar resistance at "normal" speed. However, training with a higher intensity at "normal" speed resulted in the greatest overall muscle fiber response in each of the variables assessed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 216 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 207 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 61 28%
Student > Master 39 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 13%
Unspecified 25 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 7%
Other 47 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 121 56%
Unspecified 29 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 6%
Other 20 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 November 2019.
All research outputs
#1,001,071
of 13,865,726 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#431
of 3,031 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,665
of 211,623 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#6
of 46 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,865,726 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,031 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 211,623 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 46 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.