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The prevalence of headache may be related with the latitude: a possible role of Vitamin D insufficiency?

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Headache & Pain, May 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
40 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
37 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
The prevalence of headache may be related with the latitude: a possible role of Vitamin D insufficiency?
Published in
Journal of Headache & Pain, May 2010
DOI 10.1007/s10194-010-0223-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sanjay Prakash, Nivedita C. Mehta, Ajay S. Dabhi, Om Lakhani, Madhuri Khilari, Nilima D. Shah

Abstract

According to recent observations, there is worldwide vitamin D insufficiency (VDI) in various populations. A number of observations suggest a link between low serum levels of vitamin D and higher incidence of chronic pain. A few case reports have shown a beneficial effect of vitamin D therapy in patients with headache disorders. Serum vitamin D level shows a strong correlation with the latitude. Here, we review the literature to delineate a relation of prevalence rate of headaches with the latitude. We noted a significant relation between the prevalence of both tension-type headache and migraine with the latitude. There was a tendency for headache prevalence to increase with increasing latitude. The relation was more obvious for the lifetime prevalence for both migraine and tension-type headache. One year prevalence for migraine was also higher at higher latitude. There were limited studies on the seasonal variation of headache disorders. However, available data indicate increased frequency of headache attacks in autumn-winter and least attacks in summer. This profile of headache matches with the seasonal variations of serum vitamin D levels. The presence of vitamin D receptor, 1alpha-hydroxylase and vitamin D-binding protein in the hypothalamus further suggest a role of vitamin D deficiency in the generation of head pain.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Ireland 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Unknown 34 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 19%
Student > Bachelor 7 19%
Unspecified 4 11%
Other 3 8%
Other 8 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 51%
Unspecified 5 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 11%
Psychology 3 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 5 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 April 2019.
All research outputs
#885,608
of 13,187,018 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Headache & Pain
#73
of 808 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,829
of 210,999 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Headache & Pain
#1
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,187,018 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 808 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 210,999 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.