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Aiming to Preserve Pulmonary Valve Function in Tetralogy of Fallot Repair: Comparing a New Approach to Traditional Management

Overview of attention for article published in Pediatric Cardiology, February 2016
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Title
Aiming to Preserve Pulmonary Valve Function in Tetralogy of Fallot Repair: Comparing a New Approach to Traditional Management
Published in
Pediatric Cardiology, February 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00246-016-1355-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Danielle Gottlieb Sen, Marc Najjar, Betul Yimaz, Stéphanie M. Levasseur, Bindu Kalessan, Jan M. Quaegebeur, Emile A. Bacha

Abstract

Pulmonary valve (PV) incompetence following transannular patch (TAP) repair of tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) results in long-term morbidity and mortality. Valve-sparing repairs have recently gained recognition; however, they may be associated with residual pulmonary stenosis (PS) in patients with small PV z scores. We sought to determine whether a repair that increases the PV annulus and augments the valve leaflet with a biomaterial would result in annular growth and in longer duration of valve competence compared with TAP. Eighty patients (median age 136 days, range 4-350) who underwent surgical repair of TOF between 2010 and 2014 were included in the study. Patients were divided into three groups based on the PV intervention: balloon dilation/valvotomy (n = 29), valve-sparing transannular repair (VSTAR) (n = 19) and TAP (n = 32). Intraoperative, early postoperative and midterm follow-up echocardiographic data (median 19 months, range 1-59) were obtained. The primary outcomes were the presence and severity of pulmonary regurgitation and/or PS. Compared with TAP, VSTAR patients demonstrated significantly less severe PR with 100 % freedom of severe PR immediately post-op (vs. 0 % in TAP), 60 % at 6 months and 20 % at 20 months. There were no differences in PS between VSTAR and TAP at follow-up. A subgroup analysis of the VSTAR group was performed. PV z scores were calculated and fit to a random effects model. Patient data fit the model closely, predicting a reproducible increase in valve annulus size over time. With better short-term and comparable midterm results, VSTAR may be appropriate for TOF repair in patients with small PV that would conventionally require a TAP.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 5%
Unknown 19 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 30%
Student > Postgraduate 3 15%
Researcher 3 15%
Student > Master 2 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 10%
Other 4 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 80%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Unspecified 1 5%
Computer Science 1 5%
Arts and Humanities 1 5%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 February 2016.
All research outputs
#10,833,132
of 12,219,921 outputs
Outputs from Pediatric Cardiology
#580
of 1,057 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#245,233
of 290,223 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Pediatric Cardiology
#36
of 69 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 69 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.