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Pathogens trigger top-down climate forcing on ecosystem dynamics

Overview of attention for article published in Oecologia, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
50 Mendeley
Title
Pathogens trigger top-down climate forcing on ecosystem dynamics
Published in
Oecologia, February 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00442-016-3575-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eric Edeline, Andreas Groth, Bernard Cazelles, David Claessen, Ian J. Winfield, Jan Ohlberger, L. Asbjørn Vøllestad, Nils C. Stenseth, Michael Ghil

Abstract

Evaluating the effects of climate variation on ecosystems is of paramount importance for our ability to forecast and mitigate the consequences of global change. However, the ways in which complex food webs respond to climate variations remain poorly understood. Here, we use long-term time series to investigate the effects of temperature variation on the intraguild-predation (IGP) system of Windermere (UK), a lake where pike (Esox lucius, top predator) feed on small-sized perch (Perca fluviatilis) but compete with large-sized perch for the same food sources. Spectral analyses of time series reveal that pike recruitment dynamics are temperature controlled. In 1976, expansion of a size-truncating perch pathogen into the lake severely impacted large perch and favoured pike as the IGP-dominant species. This pathogen-induced regime shift to a pike-dominated IGP apparently triggered a temperature-controlled trophic cascade passing through pike down to dissolved nutrients. In simple food chains, warming is predicted to strengthen top-down control by accelerating metabolic rates in ectothermic consumers, while pathogens of top consumers are predicted to dampen this top-down control. In contrast, the local IGP structure in Windermere made warming and pathogens synergistic in their top-down effects on ecosystem functioning. More generally, our results point to top predators as major mediators of community response to global change, and show that size-selective agents (e.g. pathogens, fishers or hunters) may change the topological architecture of food webs and alter whole ecosystem sensitivity to climate variation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 2%
Mexico 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 46 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 20%
Student > Master 8 16%
Professor 4 8%
Unspecified 4 8%
Other 9 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 40%
Environmental Science 14 28%
Unspecified 8 16%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 4%
Mathematics 1 2%
Other 5 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 May 2016.
All research outputs
#1,404,453
of 12,960,324 outputs
Outputs from Oecologia
#302
of 3,103 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#39,826
of 267,369 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Oecologia
#13
of 67 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,960,324 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,103 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,369 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 67 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.