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Trauma Therapists’ Clinical Applications, Training, and Personal Practice of Mindfulness and Meditation

Overview of attention for article published in Mindfulness, February 2016
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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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85 Mendeley
Title
Trauma Therapists’ Clinical Applications, Training, and Personal Practice of Mindfulness and Meditation
Published in
Mindfulness, February 2016
DOI 10.1007/s12671-016-0497-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lynn C. Waelde, Jason M. Thompson, Alicia Robinson, Sierra Iwanicki

Abstract

Mindfulness and meditation (MM) are increasingly used in trauma treatment, yet there is little research about therapist qualifications and clinical applications of these practices. We surveyed trauma therapists (N = 116) about their clinical uses, training, and personal practice of MM. Most respondents reported use of MM in trauma therapy, primarily MM-related imagery and breathing exercises and mindfulness in session or daily life. Almost a third used mindfulness-based stress reduction, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, or mindfulness-based relapse prevention. Across all respondents, 66 % were trained by a mental health (MH) professional, 16 % were trained exclusively by a spiritual teacher, and 18 % received no training. On average, therapists used four types of MM. Less than half maintained a personal meditation practice and only 9 % reported practicing daily meditation. Therapists who were trained by a MH professional were more likely to integrate MM into trauma psychotherapy; those who were trained by a spiritual teacher were more likely to teach clients to use MM between sessions and reported more personal practice of MM. Results indicate divergence from standard recommendations for therapist personal practice and professional training in manualized uses; however, there is little guidance about requisite training and personal practice to support individualized uses of MM such as breathing exercises and imagery. Further research should address relationships of therapist training and personal practice to clinical outcomes in MM-informed trauma therapy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 85 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 83 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 21%
Unspecified 13 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 14%
Student > Bachelor 9 11%
Researcher 9 11%
Other 24 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 50 59%
Unspecified 17 20%
Social Sciences 10 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 2%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 2%
Other 4 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 May 2016.
All research outputs
#7,710,782
of 12,787,438 outputs
Outputs from Mindfulness
#555
of 840 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#132,629
of 266,729 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Mindfulness
#19
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,787,438 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 840 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,729 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.