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The Effect of Cigarette Smoke Extract on Trophoblast Cell Viability and Migration: The Role of Adrenomedullin

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Sciences, January 2012
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Title
The Effect of Cigarette Smoke Extract on Trophoblast Cell Viability and Migration: The Role of Adrenomedullin
Published in
Reproductive Sciences, January 2012
DOI 10.1177/1933719111426600
Pubmed ID
Authors

Timothy R. Beiswenger, Liping Feng, Haywood L. Brown, R. Phillips Heine, Amy P. Murtha, Chad A. Grotegut

Abstract

We tested the hypothesis that cigarette smoke extract (CSE) leads to differences in expression of genes involved in angiogenesis and affects cell viability and migration in a first-trimester cytotrophoblast cell line (HTR-8/SVneo). HTR-8/SVneo cells were treated with 1% CSE, and gene expression for adrenomedullin (ADM), placental growth factor (PlGF), soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFLT-1), and vascular endothelia growth factor (VEGF) and protein content for ADM, PlGF, and sFlt-1 determined. A cell viability assay and a cell migration scratch assay were utilized following treatment with CSE with and without ADM inhibitor. Adrenomedullin, PlGF, and VEGF gene transcripts were significantly upregulated by 1% CSE treatment compared with unstimulated cells or cells treated with nicotine alone. Neither 1% CSE nor nicotine treatment alone affected sFlt-1 gene expression. There was a significant increase in secreted ADM protein from cells treated with 1% CSE detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay, though no differences in PlGF or sFlt-1 production were seen. Treatment with 1% CSE increased cell viability and cell migration compared with unstimulated cells and was inhibited by co-treatment with ADM inhibitor. Treatment of a first-trimester trophoblast cell line with CSE increases cell viability and cell migration that are reversed by co-treatment with ADM inhibitor, suggesting that ADM at least partially mediates cell growth and viability following CSE treatment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 6%
Unknown 16 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 12%
Other 1 6%
Student > Bachelor 1 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 6%
Other 2 12%
Unknown 5 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 6%
Psychology 1 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 6 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 January 2012.
All research outputs
#11,160,454
of 12,544,848 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Sciences
#407
of 604 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#183,630
of 216,066 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Sciences
#24
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,544,848 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 604 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 216,066 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.