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Differential migration and the link between winter latitude, timing of migration, and breeding in a songbird

Overview of attention for article published in Oecologia, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
10 tweeters

Citations

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21 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
92 Mendeley
Title
Differential migration and the link between winter latitude, timing of migration, and breeding in a songbird
Published in
Oecologia, February 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00442-015-3527-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bradley K. Woodworth, Amy E. M. Newman, Sheela P. Turbek, Bryant C. Dossman, Keith A. Hobson, Leonard I. Wassenaar, Greg W. Mitchell, Nathaniel T. Wheelwright, D. Ryan Norris

Abstract

Patterns of connectivity between breeding and wintering grounds can have important implications for individual fitness and population dynamics. Using light-level geolocators and stable hydrogen isotopes (δ(2)H) in feathers, we evaluated differential migration of Savannah sparrows (Passerculus sandwichensis) breeding on Kent Island in the Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick, Canada in relation to sex, age, and body size. Based on geolocators recovered from 38 individuals between 2012 and 2014, the winter distribution was centered in North Carolina (median latitude 34°, range 26°-41°), with males overwintering, on average, approximately 275 km further north than females. Based on analyses of tail feather samples collected from 106 individuals from the same population between 2008 and 2012, males and adults had more negative δ(2)H values than females and juveniles, respectively, providing additional evidence that males wintered north of females and that adults wintered north of juveniles. Winter latitude and δ(2)H values within each sex were not found to be related to body size. From geolocator data, males returned to the breeding grounds, on average, 14 days earlier than females. For males, there was some evidence that arrival date on the breeding grounds was negatively correlated with winter latitude and that individuals which arrived earlier tended to breed earlier. Thus, benefits for males of early arrival on the breeding grounds may have contributed to their wintering farther north than females. Social dominance may also have contributed to age and sex differences in winter latitude, whereby dominant males and adults forced subordinate females and juveniles further south.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 92 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Mexico 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 88 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 26%
Student > Master 20 22%
Researcher 16 17%
Student > Bachelor 13 14%
Unspecified 7 8%
Other 12 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 70 76%
Environmental Science 10 11%
Unspecified 8 9%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 1%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 1%
Other 2 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 February 2016.
All research outputs
#818,828
of 12,960,324 outputs
Outputs from Oecologia
#113
of 3,103 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,504
of 267,300 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Oecologia
#3
of 67 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,960,324 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,103 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,300 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 67 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.