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Key Aspects of a Sustainable Health Insurance System in Germany

Overview of attention for article published in Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
22 Mendeley
Title
Key Aspects of a Sustainable Health Insurance System in Germany
Published in
Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, February 2016
DOI 10.1007/s40258-016-0223-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matthias Pelster, Vera Hagemann, Franziska Laporte Uribe

Abstract

The main goals of health-care systems are to improve the health of the population they serve, respond to people's legitimate expectations, and offer fair financing. As a result, the health system in Germany is subject to continuous adaption as well as public and political discussions about its design. This paper analyzes the key challenges for the German health-care system and the underlying factors driving these challenges. We aim to identify possible solutions to put the German health-care system in a better position to face these challenges. We utilize a broad array of methods to answer these questions, including a review of the published and grey literature on health-care planning in Germany, semi-structured interviews with stakeholders in the system, and an online questionnaire. We find that the most urgent (and manageable) aspects that merit attention are holistic hospital planning, initiatives to increase (administrative) innovation in the health-care system, incentives to increase prevention, and approaches to increase analytical quality assurance. We found that hospital planning, innovation, quality control, and prevention, are considered to be the topics most in need of attention in the German health system.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 23%
Researcher 5 23%
Student > Bachelor 4 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 9%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 18%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 14%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 9%
Other 4 18%
Unknown 1 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 May 2016.
All research outputs
#7,519,695
of 13,042,297 outputs
Outputs from Applied Health Economics and Health Policy
#268
of 499 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#121,842
of 267,252 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Applied Health Economics and Health Policy
#15
of 34 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,042,297 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 499 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,252 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 34 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.