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Environmental Enrichment Alters Splenic Immune Cell Composition and Enhances Secondary Influenza Vaccine Responses in Mice

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Medicine, March 2014
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Title
Environmental Enrichment Alters Splenic Immune Cell Composition and Enhances Secondary Influenza Vaccine Responses in Mice
Published in
Molecular Medicine, March 2014
DOI 10.2119/molmed.2013.00158
Pubmed ID
Authors

Blake T. Gurfein, Olga Davidenko, Mary Premenko-Lanier, Jeffrey M. Milush, Michael Acree, Mary F. Dallman, Chadi Touma, Rupert Palme, Vanessa A. York, Gilles Fromentin, Nicolas Darcel, Douglas F. Nixon, Frederick M. Hecht

Abstract

Chronic stress has deleterious effects on immune function, which can lead to adverse health outcomes. However, studies investigating the impact of stress reduction interventions on immunity in clinical research have yielded divergent results, potentially stemming from differences in study design and genetic heterogeneity, among other clinical research challenges. To test the hypothesis that reducing glucocorticoid levels enhances certain immune functions, we administered influenza vaccine once (prime) or twice (boost) to mice housed in either standard control caging or environmental enrichment (EE) caging. We have shown that this approach reduces mouse corticosterone production. Compared with controls, EE mice had significantly lower levels of fecal corticosterone metabolites (FCMs) and increased splenic B and T lymphocyte numbers. Corticosterone levels were negatively associated with the numbers of CD19(+) (r(2) = 0.43, p = 0.0017), CD4(+) (r(2) = 0.28, p = 0.0154) and CD8(+) cells (r(2) = 0.20, p = 0.0503). Vaccinated mice showed nonsignificant differences in immunoglobulin G (IgG) titer between caging groups, although EE mice tended to exhibit larger increases in titer from prime to boost than controls; the interaction between the caging group (control versus EE) and vaccine group (prime versus boost) showed a strong statistical trend (cage-group*vaccine-group, F = 4.27, p = 0.0555), suggesting that there may be distinct effects of EE caging on primary versus secondary IgG vaccine responses. Vaccine-stimulated splenocytes from boosted EE mice had a significantly greater frequency of interleukin 5 (IL-5)-secreting cells than boosted controls (mean difference 7.7, IL-5 spot-forming units/10(6) splenocytes, 95% confidence interval 0.24-135.1, p = 0.0493) and showed a greater increase in the frequency of IL-5-secreting cells from prime to boost. Our results suggest that corticosterone reduction via EE caging was associated with enhanced secondary vaccine responses, but had little effect on primary responses in mice. These findings help identify differences in primary and secondary vaccine responses in relationship to stress mediators that may be relevant in clinical studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Colombia 1 3%
Unknown 31 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 19%
Researcher 6 19%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 19%
Student > Master 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 13%
Other 5 16%
Unknown 1 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 6 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 16%
Unspecified 5 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 16%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 9%
Other 7 22%
Unknown 1 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 February 2016.
All research outputs
#3,636,043
of 7,200,541 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Medicine
#157
of 317 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#152,314
of 284,177 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Medicine
#5
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,200,541 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 317 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.