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Investigation of the Origin and Spread of a Mammalian Transposable Element Based on Current Sequence Diversity

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Molecular Evolution, January 2012
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Citations

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28 Mendeley
Title
Investigation of the Origin and Spread of a Mammalian Transposable Element Based on Current Sequence Diversity
Published in
Journal of Molecular Evolution, January 2012
DOI 10.1007/s00239-011-9475-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elizabeth H. B. Hellen, John F. Y. Brookfield

Abstract

Almost half the human genome consists of mobile DNA elements, and their analysis is a vital part of understanding the human genome as a whole. Many of these elements are ancient and have persisted in the genome for tens or hundreds of millions of years, providing a window into the evolution of modern mammals. The Golem family have been used as model transposons to highlight computational analyses which can be used to investigate these elements, particularly the use of molecular dating with large transposon families. Whole-genome searches found Golem sequences in 20 mammalian species. Golem A and B subsequences were only found in primates and squirrel. Interestingly, the full-length Golem, found as a few copies in many mammalian genomes, was found abundantly in horse. A phylogenetic profile suggested that Golem originated after the eutherian-metatherian divergence and that the A and B subfamilies originated at a much later date. Molecular dating based on sequence diversity suggests an early age, of 175 Mya, for the origin of the family and that the A and B lineages originated much earlier than expected from their current taxonomic distribution and have subsequently been lost in some lineages. Using publically available data, it is possible to investigate the evolutionary history of transposon families. Determining in which organisms a transposon can be found is often used to date the origin and expansion of the families. However, in this analysis, molecular dating, commonly used for determining the age of gene sequences, has been used, reducing the likelihood of errors from deleted lineages.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 4 14%
United Kingdom 1 4%
Spain 1 4%
Russia 1 4%
Canada 1 4%
Unknown 20 71%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 36%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 25%
Student > Master 4 14%
Professor 2 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Other 3 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 79%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 11%
Computer Science 2 7%
Unspecified 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 January 2012.
All research outputs
#4,607,164
of 8,594,058 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Molecular Evolution
#592
of 757 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#117,136
of 253,242 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Molecular Evolution
#3
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,594,058 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 757 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,242 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.