↓ Skip to main content

Effects of exercise stress on the endocannabinoid system in humans under field conditions

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, November 2011
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
34 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
55 Mendeley
Title
Effects of exercise stress on the endocannabinoid system in humans under field conditions
Published in
European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, November 2011
DOI 10.1007/s00421-011-2237-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. Feuerecker, D. Hauer, R. Toth, F. Demetz, J. Hölzl, M. Thiel, I. Kaufmann, G. Schelling, A. Choukèr

Abstract

The effects of physical exercise stress on the endocannabinoid system in humans are almost unexplored. In this prospective study, we investigated in a crossover design and under field conditions at different altitudes the effects of physical exercise on the endocannabinoid system (ECS) in 12 trained healthy volunteers. For determination of alterations on the ECS three different protocols were analyzed: Protocol A (physical exercise at lower altitude) involved strenuous hiking below 2,100 m, whereas Protocol B (physical exercise by active ascent to high altitude) involved hiking up to 3,196 m, an accommodation at the cottage and a descent the next day. Protocol C (passive ascent) included a helicopter ascent to 3,196 m, an overnight stay at this altitude and a flight back to the base camp the following day. The cumulative hiked altitude in Protocol A and B was comparable (~1,650 m). The blood EC concentrations of anandamide increased significantly in Protocol A/B from baseline (T0) 0.12 ± 0.01/0.16 ± 0.02 (mean ± SEM) to 0.27 ± 0.02/0.42 ± 0.02 after exercise (T1) (p < 0.05). Anandamide levels in Protocol C remained stable at 0.20 ± 0.02. We conclude that the ECS is activated upon strenuous exercise whereas the combination with hypoxic stress further increases its activity. The reduced partial pressure of oxygen at high altitude alone did not affect this system. In summary, physical exercise activates the endocannabinoid system, whereas the combination with high altitude enhances this activation. This discloses new perspectives to adaptation mechanisms to physical exercise.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 53 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 16%
Student > Bachelor 9 16%
Unspecified 7 13%
Student > Postgraduate 5 9%
Other 15 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 12 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 11%
Neuroscience 6 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 9%
Other 15 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 July 2012.
All research outputs
#7,024,325
of 12,220,965 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#1,856
of 2,771 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#109,052
of 241,460 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#31
of 67 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,220,965 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,771 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 241,460 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 67 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.