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Pheromone Communication in Nasonia vitripennis: Abdominal Sex Attractant Mediates Site Fidelity of Releasing Males

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Chemical Ecology, December 2010
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35 Mendeley
Title
Pheromone Communication in Nasonia vitripennis: Abdominal Sex Attractant Mediates Site Fidelity of Releasing Males
Published in
Journal of Chemical Ecology, December 2010
DOI 10.1007/s10886-010-9898-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joachim Ruther, Kathleen Thal, Sven Steiner

Abstract

Males of the parasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) use a substrate-borne sex pheromone to attract virgin females. The pheromone is synthesized in the rectal vesicle and deposited via the anus by dabbing movements of the abdominal tip. The chemicals attracting the females are composed of a mixture (4R,5R- and (4R,5 S)-5-hydroxy-4-decanolides (HDL) being synergized by the trace component 4-methylquinazoline (4-MeQ) which is not attractive for females when offered alone. Here we show that male pheromone deposits are not only attractive to virgin females but also for the releasing males themselves. In an olfactometer bioassay, males were strongly attracted by their own pheromone markings but were unable to discriminate between their own markings and those deposited by other males. Polar fractions of pheromone gland extracts containing the HDLs and 4-MeQ were also highly attractive for males. Bioassays using synthetic pheromones in natural doses revealed that combinations of HDL/4-MeQ and 4-MeQ alone attracted males whereas the HDLs alone were behaviorally inactive. Furthermore, males did not discriminate between HDL/4-MeQ and 4-MeQ alone. We conclude that the trace component 4-MeQ mediates site fidelity of N. vitripennis males at sites previously marked with the abdominal sex pheromone. The use of 4-MeQ to stay at and to return to scent-marked patches rather than marking new ones might be a strategy to economize semiochemical use in N. vitripennis males.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 3%
Unknown 34 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 34%
Student > Bachelor 7 20%
Student > Master 6 17%
Professor 2 6%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 6%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 1 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 74%
Environmental Science 3 9%
Unspecified 2 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Chemistry 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 1 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 March 2011.
All research outputs
#7,698,022
of 12,318,771 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Chemical Ecology
#1,074
of 1,415 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#124,401
of 239,010 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Chemical Ecology
#5
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,318,771 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,415 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 239,010 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.