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Doctors Who Integrate Spirituality and CAM in the Clinic: The Puerto Rican Case

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Religion & Health, February 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

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mendeley
9 Mendeley
Title
Doctors Who Integrate Spirituality and CAM in the Clinic: The Puerto Rican Case
Published in
Journal of Religion & Health, February 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10943-016-0198-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jesús Soto-Espinosa, Joan D. Koss-Chioino

Abstract

This article describes Puerto Rican physicians' personal and clinical utilization of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM), its effects, and use as they identified as either Spiritist, spiritual or religious. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 74 doctors in Puerto Rico. Major themes and relationships among them were charted using the qualitative data analysis program MAXQDA, open coding and grounded theory. Thirty-one doctors spoke of CAM and its use as related to their spiritual or religious perspectives. Spiritual or Spiritist doctors were more inclined than religious doctors to utilize CAM. Seeking closer relationships with patients was related to a spiritually oriented goal of healing (as distinct from curing) as a reason to recommend CAM.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 2 22%
Student > Master 1 11%
Other 1 11%
Professor 1 11%
Student > Postgraduate 1 11%
Other 3 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 22%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 22%
Psychology 2 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 11%
Social Sciences 1 11%
Other 1 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 August 2017.
All research outputs
#6,940,684
of 12,337,531 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Religion & Health
#267
of 640 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#146,243
of 344,259 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Religion & Health
#16
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,337,531 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 640 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 344,259 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.