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Mechanism of Developmental Change in the PLAY Project Home Consultation Program: Evidence from a Randomized Control Trial

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, January 2016
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120 Mendeley
Title
Mechanism of Developmental Change in the PLAY Project Home Consultation Program: Evidence from a Randomized Control Trial
Published in
Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, January 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10803-016-2720-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gerald Mahoney, Richard Solomon

Abstract

This investigation is a secondary analysis of data from a randomized control trial of the PLAY Home Consultation Intervention Program which was conducted with 112 preschool children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and their parents (Solomon et al. in J Dev Behav Pediatr 35:475-485, 2014). Subjects were randomly assigned to either a community standard (CS) treatment group or to the PLAY Project plus CS Treatment (PLAY). PLAY subjects received monthly parent-child intervention sessions for 1 year during which parents learned how to use the rationale and interactive strategies of the Developmental, Individual-differences, Relationship-based (DIR) intervention model (Greenspan and Weider in The child with special needs: encouraging intellectual and emotional growth. DeCapo Press, Cambridge, MA, 1998) to engage in more responsive, affective and less directive interactions with their children. This investigation examined whether PLAY intervention effects on parents' style of interacting with their children as well as on children's social engagement mediated the effects of PLAY on children's autism severity as measured by ADOS calibrated severity scores. Regression procedures were used to test for mediation. There were two main findings. First the effects of PLAY on children's social engagement were mediated by the increases in parental responsiveness and affect that were promoted by PLAY. Second, the effects of PLAY on the severity children's Social Affect disorders were mediated by changes in parental responsiveness and affect; however, the effects of Responsive/Affect were mediated by the impact these variables had on children's social engagement. Results are discussed in terms of contemporary models of developmental change including the developmental change model that is the foundation for DIR.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 120 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Sweden 1 <1%
Unknown 119 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 24 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 18%
Unspecified 20 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 11%
Researcher 13 11%
Other 29 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 39 33%
Unspecified 28 23%
Social Sciences 21 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 8%
Other 10 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 February 2016.
All research outputs
#7,695,561
of 12,316,253 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders
#2,425
of 3,051 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#180,650
of 343,356 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders
#125
of 134 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,316,253 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,051 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 343,356 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 134 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.