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Physiological Responses and Expression Profile of NADPH Oxidase in Rice (Oryza Sativa) Seedlings under Different Levels of Submergence

Overview of attention for article published in Rice, January 2016
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Title
Physiological Responses and Expression Profile of NADPH Oxidase in Rice (Oryza Sativa) Seedlings under Different Levels of Submergence
Published in
Rice, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12284-016-0074-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yu-Sian Wu, Chin-Ying Yang

Abstract

Flooding due to global climate change is a serious problem that frequently decreases crop yields. Rice fields in flood-prone areas often experience full or partial submergence. Submergence has an adverse effect on internal oxygen availability, sugar status and survival. Complete submergence imposes severe pressure on plants, principally because the excess water in their surroundings deprives them of certain basic resources such as oxygen, carbon dioxide and light for photosynthesis. To better understand the mechanisms involved under different levels of flooding, it is necessary to further observe physiological responses and to identify the Rboh genes involved and determine how they are regulated during submergence. In this study, significant physiological changes were observed in plant height, leaf sheath elongation and chlorophyll a, b and total content under partial and full submergence treatments. Senescence-regulating genes were severely affected under full submergence. Additionally, intracellular oxidative homeostasis was disrupted by overproduction of H2O2 and O2 (-), which affected cell viability and antioxidant enzyme activity, under different levels of submergence. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses revealed that complex regulation of Rboh genes is involved under different levels of submergence. Our results demonstrated that the effect of physiological and the transcript levels of OsRboh genes were presented different responses to different levels of submergence in rice seedlings. There have different mechanism in intracellular to response different levels of submergence. Finally we discuss effects of the regulation of OsRboh expression and ROS production which was important to maintain homeostasis to help rice seedlings face different levels of submergence.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 44 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 22%
Researcher 10 22%
Student > Master 7 15%
Lecturer 3 7%
Other 3 7%
Other 10 22%
Unknown 3 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 54%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 13%
Arts and Humanities 2 4%
Engineering 2 4%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 4 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 January 2016.
All research outputs
#11,373,600
of 12,787,438 outputs
Outputs from Rice
#156
of 198 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#273,944
of 333,364 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Rice
#1
of 1 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 198 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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