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Chemotaxis signaling systems in model beneficial plant–bacteria associations

Overview of attention for article published in Plant Molecular Biology, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
61 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
131 Mendeley
Title
Chemotaxis signaling systems in model beneficial plant–bacteria associations
Published in
Plant Molecular Biology, January 2016
DOI 10.1007/s11103-016-0432-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Birgit E. Scharf, Michael F. Hynes, Gladys M. Alexandre

Abstract

Beneficial plant-microbe associations play critical roles in plant health. Bacterial chemotaxis provides a competitive advantage to motile flagellated bacteria in colonization of plant root surfaces, which is a prerequisite for the establishment of beneficial associations. Chemotaxis signaling enables motile soil bacteria to sense and respond to gradients of chemical compounds released by plant roots. This process allows bacteria to actively swim towards plant roots and is thus critical for competitive root surface colonization. The complete genome sequences of several plant-associated bacterial species indicate the presence of multiple chemotaxis systems and a large number of chemoreceptors. Further, most soil bacteria are motile and capable of chemotaxis, and chemotaxis-encoding genes are enriched in the bacteria found in the rhizosphere compared to the bulk soil. This review compares the architecture and diversity of chemotaxis signaling systems in model beneficial plant-associated bacteria and discusses their relevance to the rhizosphere lifestyle. While it is unclear how controlling chemotaxis via multiple parallel chemotaxis systems provides a competitive advantage to certain bacterial species, the presence of a larger number of chemoreceptors is likely to contribute to the ability of motile bacteria to survive in the soil and to compete for root surface colonization.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 131 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 128 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 40 31%
Researcher 24 18%
Student > Master 17 13%
Student > Bachelor 14 11%
Unspecified 13 10%
Other 23 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 67 51%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 27 21%
Unspecified 16 12%
Environmental Science 7 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 3%
Other 10 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 March 2016.
All research outputs
#6,923,030
of 12,316,795 outputs
Outputs from Plant Molecular Biology
#1,949
of 2,374 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#143,847
of 341,618 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Plant Molecular Biology
#19
of 50 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,316,795 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,374 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 341,618 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 50 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.