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The 1-hour post-load glucose level is more effective than HbA1c for screening dysglycemia

Overview of attention for article published in Acta Diabetologica, January 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

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5 tweeters

Citations

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21 Dimensions

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23 Mendeley
Title
The 1-hour post-load glucose level is more effective than HbA1c for screening dysglycemia
Published in
Acta Diabetologica, January 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00592-015-0829-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ram Jagannathan, Mary Ann Sevick, Dorothy Fink, Rachel Dankner, Angela Chetrit, Jesse Roth, Martin Buysschaert, Michael Bergman

Abstract

To assess the performance of HbA1c and the 1-h plasma glucose (PG ≥ 155 mg/dl; 8.6 mmol/l) in identifying dysglycemia based on the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) from a real-world clinical care setting. This was a diagnostic test accuracy study. For this analysis, we tested the HbA1c diagnostic criteria advocated by the American Diabetes Association (ADA 5.7-6.4 %) and International Expert Committee (IEC 6.0-6.4 %) against conventional OGTT criteria. We also tested the utility of 1-h PG ≥ mg/dl; 8.6 mmol/l. Prediabetes was defined according to ADA-OGTT guidelines. Spearman correlation tests were used to determine the relationships between HbA1c, 1-h PG with fasting, 2-h PG and indices of insulin sensitivity and β-cell function. The levels of agreement between diagnostic methods were ascertained using Cohen's kappa coefficient (Κ). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to analyze the performance of the HbA1c and 1-h PG test in identifying prediabetes considering OGTT as reference diagnostic criteria. The diagnostic properties of different HbA1c thresholds were contrasted by determining sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios (LR). Of the 212 high-risk individuals, 70 (33 %) were identified with prediabetes, and 1-h PG showed a stronger association with 2-h PG, insulin sensitivity index, and β-cell function than HbA1c (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the level of agreement between 1-h PG ≥ 155 mg/dl (8.6 mmol/l) and the OGTT (Κ[95 % CI]: 0.40[0.28-0.53]) diagnostic test was stronger than that of ADA-HbA1c criteria 0.1[0.03-0.16] and IEC criteria (0.17[0.04-0.30]). The ROC (AUC[95 % CI]) for HbA1c and 1-h PG were 0.65[0.57-0.73] and 0.79[0.72-0.85], respectively. Importantly, 1-h PG ≥ 155 mg/dl (8.6 mmol/l) showed good sensitivity (74.3 % [62.4-84.0]) and specificity 69.7 % [61.5-77.1]) with a LR of 2.45. The ability of 1-h PG to discriminate prediabetes was better than that of HbA1c (∆AUC: -0.14; Z value: 2.5683; P = 0.01022). In a real-world clinical practice setting, the 1-h PG ≥ 155 mg/dl (8.6 mmol/l) is superior for detecting high-risk individuals compared with HbA1c. Furthermore, HbA1c is a less precise correlate of insulin sensitivity and β-cell function than the 1-h PG and correlates poorly with the 2-h PG during the OGTT.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 5 22%
Researcher 5 22%
Student > Master 3 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Other 4 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 7 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 9%
Other 7 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 January 2016.
All research outputs
#6,174,623
of 12,221,976 outputs
Outputs from Acta Diabetologica
#173
of 489 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#115,175
of 342,079 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Acta Diabetologica
#2
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,221,976 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 489 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 342,079 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.