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Pride and protein

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#20 of 1,151)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
17 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
3 Mendeley
Title
Pride and protein
Published in
Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease, January 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10545-015-9908-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

William Stern

Abstract

In Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, members of the Bennet family are either sensible or silly, and males are under-represented. This study searches for an underlying medical diagnosis that explains these features. Very retrospective literature review. Mrs Bennet, her five daughters (Jane, Elizabeth, Mary, Kitty and Lydia), her brother (Mr Gardiner) and her sister (Mrs Phillips). Family tree and associated phenotypes METHODS: The author read Pride and Prejudice. A Bennet family tree was constructed. The number of male and female descendants was analysed using a binomial model. For each character, evidence of behaviour was collected, and members of the Bennet family were categorised as either sensible or silly. Males are under-represented in Mrs Bennet's family. Assuming an equal probability of male or female offspring, this reaches statistical significance (binomial model, P = 0.03). Approximately 50 % of females in the family are silly. Silly behaviour is more prevalent during social gatherings. The family tree suggests an X-linked genetic disorder, fatal in utero or in early life to affected males, explaining the paucity of male offspring. Female carriers survive, but with cognitive difficulties, explaining the approximate 50-50 distribution of sensible and silly females in the family. The exacerbation of silliness during social gatherings may suggest an effect of protein intake, raising suspicions of a disorder of protein metabolism. Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency is one such condition. Unfortunately, there remain significant challenges in performing genetic testing on fictional characters, so definitive evidence remains elusive. Jane and Elizabeth Bennet do not show signs of the disorder. However, carriers may be asymptomatic; they should be offered genetic counselling before Bingley or Darcy offspring are considered.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 3 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 3 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 2 67%
Student > Bachelor 1 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 67%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 December 2018.
All research outputs
#1,108,982
of 14,006,060 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease
#20
of 1,151 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#33,999
of 364,476 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease
#1
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,006,060 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,151 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 364,476 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them