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Withdrawing Benzodiazepines in Patients With Anxiety Disorders

Overview of attention for article published in Current Psychiatry Reports, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
74 Mendeley
Title
Withdrawing Benzodiazepines in Patients With Anxiety Disorders
Published in
Current Psychiatry Reports, January 2016
DOI 10.1007/s11920-015-0642-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Malcolm Lader, Andri Kyriacou

Abstract

The large class of CNS-depressant medications-the benzodiazepines-have been extensively used for over 50 years, anxiety disorders being one of the main indications. A substantial proportion (perhaps up to 20-30 %) of long-term users becomes physically dependent on them. Problems with their use became manifest, and dependence, withdrawal difficulties and abuse were documented by the 1980s. Many such users experience physical and psychological withdrawal symptoms on attempted cessation and may develop clinically troublesome syndromes even during slow tapering. Few studies have been conducted to establish the optimal withdrawal schedules. The usual management comprises slow withdrawal over weeks or months together with psychotherapy of various modalities. Pharmacological aids include antidepressants such as the SSRIs especially if depressive symptoms supervene. Other pharmacological agents such as the benzodiazepine antagonist, flumazenil, and the hormonal agent, melatonin, remain largely experimental. The purpose of this review is to analyse the evidence for the efficacy of the usual withdrawal regimes and the newer agents. It is concluded that little evidence exists outside the usual principles of drug withdrawal but there are some promising leads.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Colombia 1 1%
Unknown 73 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 24%
Researcher 10 14%
Student > Bachelor 10 14%
Student > Postgraduate 10 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 8%
Other 20 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 37 50%
Unspecified 9 12%
Psychology 9 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 8 11%
Neuroscience 5 7%
Other 6 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 December 2016.
All research outputs
#1,051,557
of 12,513,856 outputs
Outputs from Current Psychiatry Reports
#113
of 816 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,587
of 351,152 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Psychiatry Reports
#6
of 39 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,513,856 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 816 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 351,152 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 39 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.