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Comparison of beak and feather disease virus prevalence and immunity-associated genetic diversity over time in an island population of red-crowned parakeets

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Virology, December 2015
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2 tweeters

Citations

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Readers on

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12 Mendeley
Title
Comparison of beak and feather disease virus prevalence and immunity-associated genetic diversity over time in an island population of red-crowned parakeets
Published in
Archives of Virology, December 2015
DOI 10.1007/s00705-015-2717-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gabrielle J. Knafler, Luis Ortiz-Catedral, Bethany Jackson, Arvind Varsani, Catherine E. Grueber, Bruce C. Robertson, Ian G. Jamieson

Abstract

Pathogen outbreaks in the wild can contribute to a population's extinction risk. Concern over the effects of pathogen outbreaks in wildlife is amplified in small, threatened populations, where degradation of genetic diversity may hinder natural selection for enhanced immunocompetence. Beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) was detected for the first time in an island population of red-crowned parakeets (Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae) in 2008 on Little Barrier Island (Hauturu-o-Toi) of New Zealand. By 2013, the prevalence of the viral infection had significantly decreased within the population. We tested whether the population of red-crowned parakeets showed a selective response to BFDV, using neutral microsatellite and two immunity-associated genetic markers, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and Toll-like receptors (TLRs). We found evidence for selection at viral-associated TLR3; however, the ability of TLR3 to elicit an immune response in the presence of BFDV warrants confirmation. Alternatively, because red-crowned parakeet populations are prone to fluctuations in size, the decrease in BFDV prevalence over time may be attributed to the Little Barrier Island population dropping below the density threshold for viral maintenance. Our results highlight that natural processes such as adaptation for enhanced immunocompetence and/or density fluctuations are efficient mechanisms for reducing pathogen prevalence in a threatened, isolated population.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 8%
Canada 1 8%
Unknown 10 83%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 25%
Student > Master 2 17%
Student > Postgraduate 2 17%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 58%
Environmental Science 2 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 8%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 8%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 8%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 August 2016.
All research outputs
#9,377,693
of 12,222,476 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Virology
#1,920
of 2,846 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#210,210
of 332,717 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Virology
#41
of 125 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,222,476 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,846 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 332,717 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 125 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.