↓ Skip to main content

A simple technique to study embodied language processes: the grip force sensor

Overview of attention for article published in Behavior Research Methods, December 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
36 Mendeley
Title
A simple technique to study embodied language processes: the grip force sensor
Published in
Behavior Research Methods, December 2015
DOI 10.3758/s13428-015-0696-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tatjana A. Nazir, Lianna Hrycyk, Quentin Moreau, Victor Frak, Anne Cheylus, Laurent Ott, Oliver Lindemann, Martin H. Fischer, Yves Paulignan, Yvonne Delevoye-Turrell

Abstract

Research in cognitive neuroscience has shown that brain structures serving perceptual, emotional, and motor processes are also recruited during the understanding of language when it refers to emotion, perception, and action. However, the exact linguistic and extralinguistic conditions under which such language-induced activity in modality-specific cortex is triggered are not yet well understood. The purpose of this study is to introduce a simple experimental technique that allows for the online measure of language-induced activity in motor structures of the brain. This technique consists in the use of a grip force sensor that captures subtle grip force variations while participants listen to words and sentences. Since grip force reflects activity in motor brain structures, the continuous monitoring of force fluctuations provides a fine-grained estimation of motor activity across time. In other terms, this method allows for both localization of the source of language-induced activity to motor brain structures and high temporal resolution of the recorded data. To facilitate comparison of the data to be collected with this tool, we present two experiments that describe in detail the technical setup, the nature of the recorded data, and the analyses (including justification about the data filtering and artifact rejection) that we applied. We also discuss how the tool could be used in other domains of behavioral research.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 3%
Canada 1 3%
Unknown 34 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 28%
Researcher 6 17%
Student > Master 5 14%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Unspecified 4 11%
Other 7 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 16 44%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 11%
Unspecified 4 11%
Neuroscience 4 11%
Other 3 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 February 2019.
All research outputs
#3,454,719
of 13,593,005 outputs
Outputs from Behavior Research Methods
#370
of 1,164 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#88,012
of 361,391 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Behavior Research Methods
#12
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,593,005 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,164 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 361,391 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.