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Current Status of Ketamine and Related Therapies for Mood and Anxiety Disorders

Overview of attention for article published in Current Behavioral Neuroscience Reports, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#32 of 111)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
46 Mendeley
Title
Current Status of Ketamine and Related Therapies for Mood and Anxiety Disorders
Published in
Current Behavioral Neuroscience Reports, October 2015
DOI 10.1007/s40473-015-0052-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sara Costi, Nicholas T. Van Dam, James W. Murrough

Abstract

Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is a leading cause of disability worldwide. Despite a plethora of established treatments, less than one-third of individuals with MDD achieve stable remission of symptoms. Given limited efficacy and significant lag time to onset of therapeutic action among conventional antidepressants, interest has shifted to treatments that act outside of the monoamine neurotransmitter systems (e.g., serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine). Preclinical and clinical research on the glutamate system has been particularly promising in this regard. Accumulating evidence shows support for a rapid antidepressant effect of ketamine - a glutamate N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist. The present article reviews the pharmacology, safety, and efficacy of ketamine as a novel therapeutic agent for mood and anxiety disorders. The majority of clinical trials using ketamine have been conducted in patients with treatment resistant forms of MDD; recent work has begun to examine ketamine in bipolar disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. The impact of ketamine on suicidal ideation is also discussed. The current status and prospects for the identification of human biomarkers of ketamine treatment response and hurdles to treatment development are considered. We conclude by considering modulators of the glutamate system other than ketamine currently in development as potential novel treatment strategies for mood and anxiety disorders.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 46 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 12 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 13%
Student > Master 4 9%
Researcher 4 9%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Other 11 24%
Unknown 5 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 14 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 28%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 13%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 7 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 February 2016.
All research outputs
#3,537,407
of 8,756,523 outputs
Outputs from Current Behavioral Neuroscience Reports
#32
of 111 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#103,029
of 317,590 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Behavioral Neuroscience Reports
#2
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,756,523 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 59th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 111 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 317,590 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.