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Trimetaphosphate Activates Prebiotic Peptide Synthesis across a Wide Range of Temperature and pH

Overview of attention for article published in Origins of Life & Evolution of the Biosphere, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#3 of 351)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
8 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
7 Mendeley
Title
Trimetaphosphate Activates Prebiotic Peptide Synthesis across a Wide Range of Temperature and pH
Published in
Origins of Life & Evolution of the Biosphere, September 2018
DOI 10.1007/s11084-018-9564-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Izabela Sibilska, Yu Feng, Lingjun Li, John Yin

Abstract

The biochemical activation of amino acids by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) drives the synthesis of proteins that are essential for all life. On the early Earth, before the emergence of cellular life, the chemical condensation of amino acids to form prebiotic peptides or proteins may have been activated by inorganic polyphosphates, such as tri metaphosphate (TP). Plausible volcanic and other potential sources of TP are known, and TP readily activates amino acids for peptide synthesis. But de novo peptide synthesis also depends on pH, temperature, and processes of solvent drying, which together define a varied range of potential activating conditions. Although we cannot replay the tape of life on Earth, we can examine how activator, temperature, acidity and other conditions may have collectively shaped its prebiotic evolution. Here, reactions of two simple amino acids, glycine and alanine, were tested, with or without TP, over a wide range of temperature (0-100 °C) and acidity (pH 1-12), while open to the atmosphere. After 24 h, products were analyzed by HPLC and mass spectrometry. In the absence of TP, glycine and alanine readily formed peptides under harsh near-boiling temperatures, extremes of pH, and within dry solid residues. In the presence of TP, however, peptides arose over a much wider range of conditions, including ambient temperature, neutral pH, and in water. These results show how polyphosphates such as TP may have enabled the transition of peptide synthesis from harsh to mild early Earth environments, setting the stage for the emergence of more complex prebiotic chemistries.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 43%
Researcher 2 29%
Student > Postgraduate 1 14%
Professor 1 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 29%
Chemical Engineering 1 14%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 14%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 14%
Other 1 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 80. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 December 2018.
All research outputs
#195,433
of 13,040,510 outputs
Outputs from Origins of Life & Evolution of the Biosphere
#3
of 351 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,111
of 263,460 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Origins of Life & Evolution of the Biosphere
#1
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,040,510 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 351 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,460 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them