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Gluten ataxia is better classified as non-celiac gluten sensitivity than as celiac disease: a comparative clinical study

Overview of attention for article published in Immunologic Research, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

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5 tweeters
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3 Facebook pages

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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45 Mendeley
Title
Gluten ataxia is better classified as non-celiac gluten sensitivity than as celiac disease: a comparative clinical study
Published in
Immunologic Research, December 2015
DOI 10.1007/s12026-015-8750-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Luis Rodrigo, Carlos Hernández-Lahoz, Eugenia Lauret, Maria Rodriguez-Peláez, Miroslav Soucek, Rachele Ciccocioppo, Peter Kruzliak

Abstract

Gluten ataxia (GA) has customarily been considered to be the main neurological manifestation of celiac disease (CD). In recent years, the condition of non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) has been defined, which includes some patients who are not considered "true celiacs." We performed a comparative clinicopathological study of these three entities. We studied 31 GA, 48 CD and 37 NCGS patients, prospectively in the same center for a period of 7 years. The protocol study included two serological determinations for gluten sensitivity [anti-gliadin IgA and IgG (AGA) and anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA (TG) antibodies], HLA-DQ2 typing, and duodenal histological assessment. Demographics and investigative findings were compared. Females were 55 % in GA, 75 % in CD (p < 0.001), and 47 % in NCGS (N.S.). GA patients were older (59 ± 14 years) than CD (43 ± 13 years) and NCGS (41 ± 8 years) groups (p < 0.001). AGA positivity was higher in GA (100 %) than in CD (48 %) groups (p < 0.001), but similar to NCGS patients (89 %; N.S.); TG positivity was lower in GA (3.2 %) than in CD (33.3 %; p < 0.001), but similar to NCGS (2.7 %; N.S.). DQ2 (+) was lower in GA (32.2 %) than in CD (89.6 %; p < 0.001), but similar to NCGS (29.7 %; N.S.). Lymphocytic enteritis (Marsh type 1) was lower in GA (9.6 %) than in CD (66.7 %; p < 0.001), but similar to NCGS (10.8 %; N.S.). The other gluten sensitivity-related characteristics measured were different to CD patients, but very close to NCGS. We conclude that GA patients are better classified within the NCGS group, than within CD.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Poland 1 2%
Norway 1 2%
Unknown 43 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 22%
Researcher 7 16%
Student > Bachelor 7 16%
Other 6 13%
Student > Postgraduate 3 7%
Other 12 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 42%
Unspecified 6 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 13%
Neuroscience 5 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 7%
Other 6 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 August 2016.
All research outputs
#3,381,385
of 12,770,195 outputs
Outputs from Immunologic Research
#121
of 634 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#90,517
of 352,267 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Immunologic Research
#6
of 44 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,770,195 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 634 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 352,267 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 44 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.