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‘The End of Sitting’: An Empirical Study on Working in an Office of the Future

Overview of attention for article published in Sports Medicine, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

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53 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
59 Mendeley
Title
‘The End of Sitting’: An Empirical Study on Working in an Office of the Future
Published in
Sports Medicine, December 2015
DOI 10.1007/s40279-015-0448-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rob Withagen, Simone R. Caljouw

Abstract

Inspired by recent findings that prolonged sitting has detrimental health effects, Rietveld Architecture Art Affordances (RAAAF) and visual artist Barbara Visser designed a working environment without chairs and desks. This environment, which they called The End of Sitting, is a sculpture whose surfaces afford working in several non-sitting postures (e.g. lying, standing, leaning). In the present study, it was tested how people use and experience The End of Sitting. Eighteen participants were to work in this environment and in a conventional office with chairs and desks, and the participants' activities, postures, and locations in each working environment were monitored. In addition, participants' experiences with working in the offices were measured with a questionnaire. It was found that 83 % of participants worked in more than one non-sitting posture in The End of Sitting. All these participants also changed location in this working environment. On the other hand, in the conventional office all but one participant sat on a chair at a desk during the entire work session. On average, participants reported that The End of Sitting supported their well-being more than the conventional office. Participants also felt more energetic after working in The End of Sitting. No differences between the working environments were found in reported concentration levels and satisfaction with the created product. The End of Sitting is a potential alternative working environment that deserves to be examined in more detail.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 53 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 2%
Australia 1 2%
Unknown 57 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 29%
Student > Master 12 20%
Researcher 7 12%
Student > Bachelor 5 8%
Unspecified 4 7%
Other 14 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 12 20%
Sports and Recreations 11 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 8%
Arts and Humanities 4 7%
Other 20 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 39. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 July 2016.
All research outputs
#378,777
of 12,577,945 outputs
Outputs from Sports Medicine
#417
of 2,128 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,139
of 348,871 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Sports Medicine
#11
of 55 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,577,945 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,128 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 29.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 348,871 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 55 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.