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High serum glucose levels are associated with a higher perceived age

Overview of attention for article published in Age, November 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#9 of 483)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
twitter
25 tweeters
facebook
7 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

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20 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
38 Mendeley
Title
High serum glucose levels are associated with a higher perceived age
Published in
Age, November 2011
DOI 10.1007/s11357-011-9339-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Raymond Noordam, David A. Gunn, Cyrena C. Tomlin, Andrea B. Maier, Simon P. Mooijaart, P. Eline Slagboom, Rudi G. J. Westendorp, Anton J. M. de Craen, Diana van Heemst

Abstract

Estimating perceived age by facial photographs is a good estimate of health in elderly populations. Previously, we showed that familial longevity is marked by a more beneficial glucose metabolism already at middle age. As glucose is also related to skin aging, this study aimed to investigate the association between glucose metabolism and perceived age. Perceived age was assessed using facial photographs and non-fasted glucose and insulin were measured in 602 subjects from the Leiden Longevity Study. Non-diabetic subjects (n = 569) were divided in three strata according to their glucose levels, and diabetic subjects (n = 33; as a proxy of long-term hyperglycemic exposure) were included as a fourth stratum. Considered confounding factors were gender, chronological age, current smoking, body mass index, photo-damage score, and insulin levels. Perceived age was increased from 59.6 years (SE = 0.3) in the first stratum to 61.2 years (SE = 0.6) in diabetic subjects (p for trend = 0.002). In non-diabetic subjects only, perceived age was increased from 59.6 years (SE = 0.3) in the first stratum to 60.6 years (SE = 0.3) in the third stratum (p for trend = 0.009). Continuously, perceived age increased 0.40 years (SE = 0.14, p = 0.006) per 1 mmol/L increase in glucose level in non-diabetic subjects. The present study demonstrates that, also among non-diabetic subjects, higher glucose levels are associated with a higher perceived age. Future research should be focused on elucidating possible mechanisms linking glucose levels to perceived age.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 25 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Russia 1 3%
Unknown 37 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 29%
Student > Bachelor 7 18%
Unspecified 6 16%
Student > Master 4 11%
Other 3 8%
Other 7 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 32%
Unspecified 8 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 5%
Other 7 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 77. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 August 2019.
All research outputs
#214,747
of 13,395,558 outputs
Outputs from Age
#9
of 483 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,887
of 206,489 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Age
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,395,558 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 483 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 206,489 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them