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The adenylate energy charge as a new and useful indicator of capture stress in chondrichthyans

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Comparative Physiology B: Biochemical, Systemic, & Environmental Physiology, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
12 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
20 Mendeley
Title
The adenylate energy charge as a new and useful indicator of capture stress in chondrichthyans
Published in
Journal of Comparative Physiology B: Biochemical, Systemic, & Environmental Physiology, December 2015
DOI 10.1007/s00360-015-0948-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Leonardo Guida, Terence I. Walker, Richard D. Reina

Abstract

Quantifying the physiological stress response of chondrichthyans to capture has assisted the development of fishing practices conducive to their survival. However, currently used indicators of stress show significant interspecific and intraspecific variation in species' physiological responses and tolerances to capture. To improve our understanding of chondrichthyan stress physiology and potentially reduce variation when quantifying the stress response, we investigated the use of the adenylate energy charge (AEC); a measure of available metabolic energy. To determine tissues sensitive to metabolic stress, we extracted samples of the brain, heart, liver, white muscle and blood from gummy sharks (Mustelus antarcticus) immediately following gillnet capture and after 3 h recovery under laboratory conditions. Capture caused significant declines in liver, white muscle and blood AEC, whereas no decline was detected in the heart and brain AEC. Following 3 h of recovery from capture, the AEC of the liver and blood returned to "unstressed" levels (control values) whereas white muscle AEC was not significantly different to that immediately after capture. Our results show that the liver is most sensitive to metabolic stress and white muscle offers a practical method to sample animals non-lethally for determination of the AEC. The AEC is a highly informative indicator of stress and unlike current indicators, it can directly measure the change in available energy and thus the metabolic stress experienced by a given tissue. Cellular metabolism is highly conserved across organisms and, therefore, we think the AEC can also provide a standardised form of measuring capture stress in many chondrichthyan species.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 20%
Researcher 3 15%
Unspecified 2 10%
Student > Bachelor 2 10%
Other 4 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 50%
Environmental Science 3 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 10%
Unspecified 2 10%
Chemistry 2 10%
Other 1 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 November 2018.
All research outputs
#2,036,141
of 13,233,669 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Comparative Physiology B: Biochemical, Systemic, & Environmental Physiology
#52
of 519 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,603
of 357,307 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Comparative Physiology B: Biochemical, Systemic, & Environmental Physiology
#3
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,233,669 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 519 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 357,307 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.