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Non-invasive molecular imaging of inflammatory macrophages in allograft rejection

Overview of attention for article published in EJNMMI Research, November 2015
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Title
Non-invasive molecular imaging of inflammatory macrophages in allograft rejection
Published in
EJNMMI Research, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13550-015-0146-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alexander S. G. O’Neill, Samantha Y. A. Terry, Kathryn Brown, Lucy Meader, Andrew M. S. Wong, Jonathan D. Cooper, Paul R. Crocker, Wilson Wong, Gregory E. D. Mullen

Abstract

Macrophages represent a critical cell type in host defense, development and homeostasis. The ability to image non-invasively pro-inflammatory macrophage infiltrate into a transplanted organ may provide an additional tool for the monitoring of the immune response of the recipient against the donor graft. We therefore decided to image in vivo sialoadhesin (Sn, Siglec 1 or CD169) using anti-Sn mAb (SER-4) directly radiolabelled with (99m)Tc pertechnetate. We used a heterotopic heart transplantation model where allogeneic or syngeneic heart grafts were transplanted into the abdomen of recipients. In vivo nanosingle-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging was performed 7 days post transplantation followed by biodistribution and histology. In wild-type mice, the majority of (99m)Tc-SER-4 monoclonal antibody cleared from the blood with a half-life of 167 min and was located predominantly on Sn(+) tissues in the spleen, liver and bone marrow. The biodistribution in the transplantation experiments confirmed data derived from the non-invasive SPECT/CT images, with significantly higher levels of (99m)Tc-SER-4 observed in allogeneic grafts (9.4 (±2.7) %ID/g) compared to syngeneic grafts (4.3 (±10.3) %ID/g) (p = 0.0022) or in mice which received allogeneic grafts injected with (99m)Tc-IgG isotype control (5.9 (±0.6) %ID/g) (p = 0.0185). The transplanted heart to blood ratio was also significantly higher in recipients with allogeneic grafts receiving (99m)Tc-SER-4 as compared to recipients with syngeneic grafts (p = 0.000004) or recipients with allogeneic grafts receiving (99m)Tc-IgG isotype (p = 0.000002). Here, we demonstrate that imaging of Sn(+) macrophages in inflammation may provide an important additional and non-invasive tool for the monitoring of the pathophysiology of cellular immunity in a transplant model.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 5%
Unknown 21 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 36%
Researcher 4 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 9%
Librarian 2 9%
Professor 1 5%
Other 4 18%
Unknown 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 14%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 5%
Computer Science 1 5%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 2 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 December 2015.
All research outputs
#8,022,018
of 12,787,140 outputs
Outputs from EJNMMI Research
#98
of 248 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#181,260
of 351,013 outputs
Outputs of similar age from EJNMMI Research
#20
of 34 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,787,140 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 248 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.8. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 351,013 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 34 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.