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Beta-alanine (Carnosyn™) supplementation in elderly subjects (60–80 years): effects on muscle carnosine content and physical capacity

Overview of attention for article published in Amino Acids, December 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#50 of 988)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
16 tweeters
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4 patents
facebook
4 Facebook pages
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1 video uploader

Citations

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67 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
102 Mendeley
Title
Beta-alanine (Carnosyn™) supplementation in elderly subjects (60–80 years): effects on muscle carnosine content and physical capacity
Published in
Amino Acids, December 2011
DOI 10.1007/s00726-011-1190-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Serena del Favero, Hamilton Roschel, Marina Y. Solis, Ana P. Hayashi, Guilherme G. Artioli, Maria Concepción Otaduy, Fabiana B. Benatti, Roger C. Harris, John A. Wise, Cláudia C. Leite, Rosa M. Pereira, Ana L. de Sá-Pinto, Antonio Herbert Lancha-Junior, Bruno Gualano

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of beta-alanine supplementation on exercise capacity and the muscle carnosine content in elderly subjects. Eighteen healthy elderly subjects (60-80 years, 10 female and 4 male) were randomly assigned to receive either beta-alanine (BA, n=12) or placebo (PL, n=6) for 12 weeks. The BA group received 3.2 g of beta-alanine per day (2×800 mg sustained-release Carnosyn™ tablets, given 2 times per day). The PL group received 2× (2×800 mg) of a matched placebo. At baseline (PRE) and after 12 weeks (POST-12) of supplementation, assessments were made of the muscle carnosine content, anaerobic exercise capacity, muscle function, quality of life, physical activity and food intake. A significant increase in the muscle carnosine content of the gastrocnemius muscle was shown in the BA group (+85.4%) when compared with the PL group (+7.2%) (p=0.004; ES: 1.21). The time-to-exhaustion in the constant-load submaximal test (i.e., TLIM) was significantly improved (p=0.05; ES: 1.71) in the BA group (+36.5%) versus the PL group (+8.6%). Similarly, time-to-exhaustion in the incremental test was also significantly increased (p=0.04; ES 1.03) following beta-alanine supplementation (+12.2%) when compared with placebo (+0.1%). Significant positive correlations were also shown between the relative change in the muscle carnosine content and the relative change in the time-to-exhaustion in the TLIM test (r=0.62; p=0.01) and in the incremental test (r=0.48; p=0.02). In summary, the current data indicate for the first time, that beta-alanine supplementation is effective in increasing the muscle carnosine content in healthy elderly subjects, with subsequent improvement in their exercise capacity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 102 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 102 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 25 25%
Student > Bachelor 22 22%
Researcher 12 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 10%
Unspecified 9 9%
Other 24 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 33 32%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 19 19%
Unspecified 12 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 9%
Other 9 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 20. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 October 2016.
All research outputs
#634,150
of 11,842,994 outputs
Outputs from Amino Acids
#50
of 988 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,520
of 257,625 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Amino Acids
#2
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,842,994 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 988 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,625 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.