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Quorum Sensing Autoinducer(s) and Flagellum Independently Mediate EPS Signaling in Vibrio cholerae Through LuxO-Independent Mechanism

Overview of attention for article published in Microbial Ecology, September 2018
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Title
Quorum Sensing Autoinducer(s) and Flagellum Independently Mediate EPS Signaling in Vibrio cholerae Through LuxO-Independent Mechanism
Published in
Microbial Ecology, September 2018
DOI 10.1007/s00248-018-1262-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Smritikana Biswas, Prithwiraj Mukherjee, Tuhin Manna, Kunal Dutta, Kartik Chandra Guchhait, Amit Karmakar, Monalisha Karmakar, Parimal Dua, Amiya Kumar Panda, Chandradipa Ghosh

Abstract

Vibrio cholerae, the Gram-negative bacterium causing lethal diarrheal disease cholera, forms biofilm on solid surfaces to gain adaptive advantage for successful survival in aquatic reservoirs. Expression of exopolysaccharide (EPS), an extracellular matrix material, has been found critical for biofilm-based environmental persistence. In a subset of epidemic-causing V. cholerae, absence of flagellum but not motility was identified to induce elevated exopolysaccharide expression. Identification of the role played by quorum sensing autoinducer molecules, i.e., cholera autoinducer 1 (CAI-1) and autoinducer 2 (AI-2) as well as central regulator LuxO on EPS expression in the subset was explored. Deletion mutations were introduced in vital genes responsible for synthesizing CAI-1 (cqsA), AI-2 (luxS), flagellum (flaA), LuxO (luxO), flagellar motor (motX), and VpsR (vpsR) in the model strain MO10. Subsequent phenotypic alterations in terms of colony morphology, EPS expression, biofilm formation, and transcription level of relevant genes were analyzed. Autoinducer cross-feeding experiment confirmed the role of autoinducers in EPS signaling. Results reveal that autoinducers and flagellum are the two major EPS signaling units in this subset where one unit becomes predominant for EPS production in absence of the other. Moreover, either unit exerts negative influence on EPS induction by the other. Both the EPS signaling cascades are independent of LuxO contribution and essentially involve sodium-driven flagellar motor and VpsR. A cell density and flagellum-mediated, but LuxO-independent, EPS signaling mechanism is considered to be functional in these organisms that confers their survival fitness.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 5 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 5 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 40%
Student > Master 1 20%
Other 1 20%
Unspecified 1 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 80%
Unspecified 1 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 September 2018.
All research outputs
#7,940,674
of 12,651,470 outputs
Outputs from Microbial Ecology
#867
of 1,219 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#133,747
of 223,822 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbial Ecology
#35
of 43 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,651,470 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,219 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 223,822 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 43 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.