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Microbial explanations for field-aged biochar mitigating greenhouse gas emissions during a rice-growing season

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Pollution Research, September 2018
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Title
Microbial explanations for field-aged biochar mitigating greenhouse gas emissions during a rice-growing season
Published in
Environmental Science & Pollution Research, September 2018
DOI 10.1007/s11356-018-3112-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zhen Wu, Xi Zhang, Yubing Dong, Xin Xu, Zhengqin Xiong

Abstract

Knowledge about the impacts of fresh and field-aged biochar amendments on greenhouse gas (CH4, N2O) emissions is limited. A field experiment was initiated in 2012 to study the effects of fresh and field-aged biochar additions on CH4 and N2O emissions and the associated microbial activity during the entire rice-growing season in typical rice-wheat rotation system in Southeast China. CH4 and N2O fluxes were monitored, and the abundance of methanogen (mcrA), methanotrophy (pmoA), ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), nitrite reductase (nirS, nirK), N2O reductase (nosZ), and potential soil enzyme activities related to CH4 and N2O were simultaneously measured throughout different rice developmental stages. There were three treatments: control (urea without biochar), fresh BC (urea with fresh biochar added in 2015), and aged BC (urea with 3-year field-aged biochar added in 2012). Results showed that field-aged biochar significantly decreased seasonal CH4 emissions by 16.8% in relation to the fresh biochar, though no significant differences were detected between biochars and control treatment. The structural equation model indicated that soil pH, microbial biomass carbon (MBC), pmoA, and mcrA were the main factors directly influenced by fresh and aged biochar amendments; aged biochar showed a negative effect while fresh biochar showed positive effects on CH4 fluxes. Both fresh and field-aged biochar obviously increased AOA and AOB abundances and reduced the (nirS+nirK)/nosZ ratio during the entire rice-growing season, although no significant effects were observed on seasonal N2O emissions. Therefore, biochar amendment produced long-term effects on total CH4 and N2O emissions through observed influences of soil pH and functional gene abundance. The figure shows how fresh and field-aged biochar differentially affected CH4 production and oxidation and N2O production and reduction through related functional gene abundances. Blue arrows indicate suppressing while pink arrows indicate promoting effect.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 27%
Researcher 2 18%
Other 2 18%
Student > Bachelor 1 9%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 9%
Other 2 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 5 45%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 36%
Engineering 2 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 September 2018.
All research outputs
#10,092,865
of 12,617,609 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Pollution Research
#1,728
of 3,385 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#200,904
of 268,187 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Pollution Research
#45
of 96 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,617,609 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 96 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.