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Towards the minimal amount of exercise for improving metabolic health: beneficial effects of reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, November 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#20 of 2,942)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
14 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
twitter
37 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
q&a
1 Q&A thread

Citations

dimensions_citation
107 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
308 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
Towards the minimal amount of exercise for improving metabolic health: beneficial effects of reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training
Published in
European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, November 2011
DOI 10.1007/s00421-011-2254-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Richard S. Metcalfe, John A. Babraj, Samantha G. Fawkner, Niels B. J. Vollaard

Abstract

High-intensity interval training (HIT) has been proposed as a time-efficient alternative to traditional cardiorespiratory exercise training, but is very fatiguing. In this study, we investigated the effects of a reduced-exertion HIT (REHIT) exercise intervention on insulin sensitivity and aerobic capacity. Twenty-nine healthy but sedentary young men and women were randomly assigned to the REHIT intervention (men, n = 7; women, n = 8) or a control group (men, n = 6; women, n = 8). Subjects assigned to the control groups maintained their normal sedentary lifestyle, whilst subjects in the training groups completed three exercise sessions per week for 6 weeks. The 10-min exercise sessions consisted of low-intensity cycling (60 W) and one (first session) or two (all other sessions) brief 'all-out' sprints (10 s in week 1, 15 s in weeks 2-3 and 20 s in the final 3 weeks). Aerobic capacity ([Formula: see text]) and the glucose and insulin response to a 75-g glucose load (OGTT) were determined before and 3 days after the exercise program. Despite relatively low ratings of perceived exertion (RPE 13 ± 1), insulin sensitivity significantly increased by 28% in the male training group following the REHIT intervention (P < 0.05). [Formula: see text] increased in the male training (+15%) and female training (+12%) groups (P < 0.01). In conclusion we show that a novel, feasible exercise intervention can improve metabolic health and aerobic capacity. REHIT may offer a genuinely time-efficient alternative to HIT and conventional cardiorespiratory exercise training for improving risk factors of T2D.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 37 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 308 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 8 3%
Spain 4 1%
Brazil 3 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 288 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 68 22%
Student > Master 62 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 56 18%
Unspecified 25 8%
Researcher 18 6%
Other 79 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 131 43%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 42 14%
Unspecified 40 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 38 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 5%
Other 43 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 173. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 June 2019.
All research outputs
#77,472
of 13,273,173 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#20
of 2,942 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#585
of 205,641 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#2
of 36 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,273,173 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,942 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 205,641 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 36 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.