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Renal Replacement Therapy in children with severe developmental disability: guiding questions for decision-making

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Pediatrics, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
13 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
10 Mendeley
Title
Renal Replacement Therapy in children with severe developmental disability: guiding questions for decision-making
Published in
European Journal of Pediatrics, September 2018
DOI 10.1007/s00431-018-3238-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lore Willem, Noël Knops, Djalila Mekahli, Pierre Cochat, Alberto Edefonti, Enrico Verrina, Jaap Groothoff, Lieven Lagae, Jacques Pirenne, Fabienne Dobbels, Pascal Borry, Chris Van Geet, Elena Levtchenko

Abstract

Whether to initiate or to withhold Renal Replacement Therapy (RRT) in children with severe developmental disability (DD) remains a topic of intense debate. The present study investigated the opinion of professionals on this difficult issue and proposed a checklist with guiding questions for decision-making. Clinicians affiliated to different organizations involved in pediatric nephrology worldwide were invited to respond to a web-based survey. This survey focused on the collection of demographic data of the respondents together with their opinion concerning the decision-making regarding RRT in a particular case and for children with severe DD in general. A total of 286 professionals responded to the survey. Sixty-six percent supported initiating RRT in the child of the case report, with pre-emptive transplantation being the preferred modality. Important arguments pro RRT initiation in children with severe DD in general were parental preference, decrease of suffering, and improvement of survival and quality of life. Important contraindications included low IQ, severe comorbidities, and inability of the patient to take medication or for the family to provide sufficient care. The present study presents an inventory on the opinions of health care professionals involved in RRT in children regarding the treatment of children with DD and assists in the decision-making process by identifying important medical and psychosocial arguments for initiating or withholding RRT in severe DD patients. What is Known: •Renal Replacement Therapy (RRT) in children with severe developmental disability (DD) is a topic of intense debate. •Previous studies on the opinion of professionals mainly focused on the use of IQ as an argument in the decision-making whether or not starting RRT. What is New: •The present study investigated the opinion of professionals with regard to considering initiation or withholding RRT in children with severe DD and identified medical and psychosocial arguments playing a role in the decision-making process. •Based on these arguments, a checklist with guiding questions for decision-making is proposed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 10 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 3 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 20%
Student > Master 1 10%
Student > Bachelor 1 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 10%
Other 2 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 3 30%
Psychology 3 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 10%
Engineering 1 10%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 20. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 January 2019.
All research outputs
#777,983
of 13,221,142 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Pediatrics
#65
of 2,317 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,339
of 265,004 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Pediatrics
#3
of 59 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,221,142 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,317 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,004 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 59 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.