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Functional electrical stimulation through direct 4-channel nerve stimulation to improve gait in multiple sclerosis: a feasibility study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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98 Mendeley
Title
Functional electrical stimulation through direct 4-channel nerve stimulation to improve gait in multiple sclerosis: a feasibility study
Published in
Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12984-015-0096-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Janet Hausmann, Catherine M. Sweeney-Reed, Uwe Sobieray, Mike Matzke, Hans-Jochen Heinze, Jürgen Voges, Lars Buentjen

Abstract

Gait dysfunction due to lower limb central paralysis, frequently involving drop foot, is a common cause of disability in multiple sclerosis and has been treated with transcutaneous functional electrical stimulation (FES). We provide here the first report of 4-channel semi-implantable FES of the peroneal nerve which has been successfully used for rehabilitation in patients following stroke. FES was implemented via a 4-channel semi-implantable closed-loop system (ActiGait®, ©Ottobock), generating dorsiflexion in drop foot. Walking distance, gait symmetry (temporospatial gait analyses, Vicon Motion Systems®), gait velocity (10 m walking test) and quality of life (SF-36 questionnaire) were measured to evaluate the therapeutic benefit of this system in two patients with progressive MS. Walking distance increased from 517 to 1884 m in Patient 1 and from 52 to 506 m in Patient 2. Gait velocity did not change significantly in Patient 1 and increased from 0.6 to 0.8 m/s in Patient 2. Maximum deviations of center of mass from the midline to each side changed significantly after 3 months of stimulation compared to baseline, decreasing from 15 to 12 mm in Patient 1 and from 47 to 37 mm in Patient 2. Both patients experienced reduced pain and fatigue and benefits to quality of life. Adverse events did not occur during the observation period. We conclude that implantable 4-channel FES systems are not only feasible but present a promising new alternative for treating central drop foot in MS patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 98 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
India 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Luxembourg 1 1%
Unknown 94 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 20 20%
Researcher 17 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 15%
Unspecified 11 11%
Student > Master 11 11%
Other 24 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 27%
Engineering 18 18%
Unspecified 16 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 15%
Neuroscience 12 12%
Other 11 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 May 2016.
All research outputs
#3,181,489
of 7,836,572 outputs
Outputs from Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
#180
of 461 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#97,865
of 290,587 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
#10
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,836,572 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 59th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 461 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 290,587 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.