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A lateralized top-down network for visuospatial attention and neglect

Overview of attention for article published in Brain Imaging and Behavior, October 2015
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Title
A lateralized top-down network for visuospatial attention and neglect
Published in
Brain Imaging and Behavior, October 2015
DOI 10.1007/s11682-015-9460-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jiaojian Wang, Yanghua Tian, Mengzhu Wang, Long Cao, Huawang Wu, Yun Zhang, Kai Wang, Tianzi Jiang

Abstract

The lateralization of visuospatial attention has been well investigated and demonstrated to be primarily resulting from unbalanced interaction between interhemispheric fronto-parietal networks in previous studies. Many recent studies of top-down attention have reported the neural signatures of its effects within visual cortex and identified its causal basis. However, the relationship between top-down networks and asymmetric visuospatial attention has not been well studied. In the current study, we aimed to explore the relationship between top-down connectivity and asymmetric visuospatial ability by using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) analyses. We used rTMS and RSFC to model the virtual lesion to assess the behavioral performances in visuospatial attention shifting and to identify the behavior-related top-down functional connectivities, respectively. Furthermore, we also investigated the top-down connectivity in neglect patients to validate the RSFC findings. RSFC analyses in healthy subjects and neglect patients consistently revealed that asymmetric visuospatial ability and visuospatial neglect were closely related to the bias of top-down functional connectivity between posterior superior parietal lobule (SPL) and V1. Our findings indicate that stronger top-down connectivity has stronger dominance on its corresponding visual field. We argue that an asymmetric top-down network may represent a possible neurophysiological substrate for the ongoing functional asymmetry of visuospatial attention, and its interhemispheric unbalanced interaction could contribute to the clinical manifestations of visuospatial neglect.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 1 2%
Netherlands 1 2%
Unknown 52 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 22%
Student > Bachelor 9 17%
Researcher 9 17%
Unspecified 7 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 11%
Other 11 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 13 24%
Psychology 11 20%
Unspecified 10 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 7%
Other 9 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 October 2017.
All research outputs
#7,853,687
of 12,517,134 outputs
Outputs from Brain Imaging and Behavior
#404
of 714 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#146,625
of 275,507 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brain Imaging and Behavior
#24
of 41 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,517,134 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 714 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,507 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 41 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.