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Retrieval of Disseminated Tumor Cells Colonizing the Bone in Murine Breast Cancer Metastasis Models

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Mammary Gland Biology & Neoplasia, October 2015
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Title
Retrieval of Disseminated Tumor Cells Colonizing the Bone in Murine Breast Cancer Metastasis Models
Published in
Journal of Mammary Gland Biology & Neoplasia, October 2015
DOI 10.1007/s10911-015-9347-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas Welte, Cuijuan Yu, Xiang H.-F. Zhang

Abstract

In breast cancer, the most frequent site of metastasis is bone. Disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) can be detected in the bone marrow of patients by their expression of epithelial or oncogenic markers [1], and the presence and frequency of these DTCs are associated with poor prognosis. However, many of the details behind this process remain elusive, including the biological properties and fates of these apparently indolent cancer cells. To provide pre-clinical models of DTCs, we have developed a procedure that allows for controlled and enhanced delivery of tumor cells to the bone in animal experiments via injection into the iliac artery of the hind limb [2]. To our surprise, we found that most cancer cells became integrated into the solid bone matrix shortly after arriving in the bone, and only a minority can be flushed out with the bone marrow. Here we describe a method that helps to retrieve DTCs homing to the bone in which we achieve an improved recovery of those tumor cells closely associated with the bone microenvironment. In our view it is especially important to analyze these tumor cell subpopulations, as they may take full advantage of growth-, survival- and immune-protective signals provided by neighbor cells. We also show a pilot study on how this approach may be applied to the analysis of cancer dormancy. Our study suggests that the detection and retrieval of DTCs in clinical studies are incomplete because they are conducted exclusively with bone marrow aspirates.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 40%
Unspecified 3 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 13%
Researcher 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 4 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 20%
Engineering 1 7%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 October 2015.
All research outputs
#10,918,200
of 12,320,698 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Mammary Gland Biology & Neoplasia
#198
of 226 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#215,377
of 263,096 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Mammary Gland Biology & Neoplasia
#3
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,320,698 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 226 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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