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The effects of raw propolis on Varroa-infested honey bee (Apis mellifera) workers

Overview of attention for article published in Parasitology Research, August 2018
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Title
The effects of raw propolis on Varroa-infested honey bee (Apis mellifera) workers
Published in
Parasitology Research, August 2018
DOI 10.1007/s00436-018-6050-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michelina Pusceddu, Ignazio Floris, Alessandra Mura, Panagiotis Theodorou, Giorgia Cirotto, Giovanna Piluzza, Simonetta Bullitta, Alberto Angioni, Alberto Satta

Abstract

Self-medication plays a major role in the behavioral defense against pathogens and parasites that animals have developed during evolution. The conditions defining this adaptive behavior are: (1) contact with the substance in question must be deliberate; (2) the substance must be detrimental to one or more parasites; (3) the detrimental effect on parasites must lead to increased host fitness. Recent studies have shown that A. mellifera colonies are able to increase resin foraging rates when infested by V. destructor, whereas further investigations are needed for evidence of parasite and host fitness. In order to understand whether Varroa-infested colonies could benefit from increasing levels of resin, we carried out laboratory bioassays to investigate the effects of propolis on the fitness of infested workers. The longevity and energetic stress of adult bees kept in experimental cages and artificially infested with the mite were thus monitored over time. At the same time, in vitro experiments were performed to study the contact effects of crude propolis on Varroa mites. Our results clearly demonstrate the positive effects of raw propolis on the lifespan of Varroa-infested adult bees. A low narcoleptic effect (19-22%) of raw propolis on phoretic mites after 5 h was also observed. In terms of energetic stress, we found no differences between Varroa-free and Varroa-infested bees in terms of the daily sucrose solution demand. Our findings seem to confirm the hypothesis that resin collection and propolis use in the hive represent an example of self-medication behavior in social insects.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 27%
Unspecified 2 18%
Researcher 2 18%
Student > Bachelor 1 9%
Lecturer 1 9%
Other 2 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 64%
Unspecified 2 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 9%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 August 2018.
All research outputs
#10,653,381
of 13,390,371 outputs
Outputs from Parasitology Research
#1,536
of 2,620 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#202,033
of 270,610 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasitology Research
#40
of 82 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,390,371 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,620 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.2. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,610 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 82 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.