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Abnormalities of thalamus volume and resting state functional connectivity in primary insomnia patients

Overview of attention for article published in Brain Imaging and Behavior, August 2018
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Title
Abnormalities of thalamus volume and resting state functional connectivity in primary insomnia patients
Published in
Brain Imaging and Behavior, August 2018
DOI 10.1007/s11682-018-9932-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Min Li, Ruonan Wang, Meng Zhao, Jinquan Zhai, Bo Liu, Dahua Yu, Kai Yuan

Abstract

Primary insomnia (PI) is associated with deteriorating attention, memory, physical and mood complaints. Based on the extensive literature demonstrating the critical roles of the thalamus in sleep regulation, we hypothesized that insomnia would be associated with functional and structural changes of the thalamus. This information is needed to better understand the neural mechanisms of insomnia, and would be useful for informing future attempts to alleviate or treat insomnia symptoms. Twenty-seven PI patients and 39 matched healthy controls were included in the present study. Subcortical volume and resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) of thalamus were compared between groups, and the relationships between neuroimaging differences and clinical features, including the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), the Insomnia Severity Index Scale (ISI), the Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) and the Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS), also be explored. Compared with the control group, the PI group showed significantly reduced volume of thalamus. In addition, several brain regions showed reduced RSFC with thalamus in PI patients, such as anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), orbitofrontal cortex, hippocampus, caudate and putamen. Correlation analyses revealed that, several of these RSFC patterns were negatively correlated with PSQI score among PI patients, including thalamic connections with the putamen, caudate, hippocampus. Negative correlation was also observed between the RSFC strength of right thalamus-right ACC and SDS score in PI patients. This work demonstrates the structural and functional abnormalities of the thalamus in PI patients that were associated with key clinical features of insomnia. These data further highlight the important role of the thalamus in sleep and PI.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 10 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 40%
Unspecified 2 20%
Researcher 2 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 10%
Student > Master 1 10%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 5 50%
Unspecified 2 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 10%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 August 2018.
All research outputs
#11,844,695
of 13,350,484 outputs
Outputs from Brain Imaging and Behavior
#690
of 776 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#231,441
of 267,444 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brain Imaging and Behavior
#28
of 32 outputs
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