↓ Skip to main content

Presence of celiac disease epitopes in modern and old hexaploid wheat varieties: wheat breeding may have contributed to increased prevalence of celiac disease

Overview of attention for article published in Theoretical & Applied Genetics, July 2010
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#1 of 2,142)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
52 tweeters
facebook
15 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
80 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
140 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
Presence of celiac disease epitopes in modern and old hexaploid wheat varieties: wheat breeding may have contributed to increased prevalence of celiac disease
Published in
Theoretical & Applied Genetics, July 2010
DOI 10.1007/s00122-010-1408-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hetty C. van den Broeck, Hein C. de Jong, Elma M. J. Salentijn, Liesbeth Dekking, Dirk Bosch, Rob J. Hamer, Ludovicus J. W. J. Gilissen, Ingrid M. van der Meer, Marinus J. M. Smulders

Abstract

Gluten proteins from wheat can induce celiac disease (CD) in genetically susceptible individuals. Specific gluten peptides can be presented by antigen presenting cells to gluten-sensitive T-cell lymphocytes leading to CD. During the last decades, a significant increase has been observed in the prevalence of CD. This may partly be attributed to an increase in awareness and to improved diagnostic techniques, but increased wheat and gluten consumption is also considered a major cause. To analyze whether wheat breeding contributed to the increase of the prevalence of CD, we have compared the genetic diversity of gluten proteins for the presence of two CD epitopes (Glia-α9 and Glia-α20) in 36 modern European wheat varieties and in 50 landraces representing the wheat varieties grown up to around a century ago. Glia-α9 is a major (immunodominant) epitope that is recognized by the majority of CD patients. The minor Glia-α20 was included as a technical reference. Overall, the presence of the Glia-α9 epitope was higher in the modern varieties, whereas the presence of the Glia-α20 epitope was lower, as compared to the landraces. This suggests that modern wheat breeding practices may have led to an increased exposure to CD epitopes. On the other hand, some modern varieties and landraces have been identified that have relatively low contents of both epitopes. Such selected lines may serve as a start to breed wheat for the introduction of 'low CD toxic' as a new breeding trait. Large-scale culture and consumption of such varieties would considerably aid in decreasing the prevalence of CD.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 52 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 140 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
Serbia 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Hungary 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 128 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 40 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 16%
Student > Bachelor 21 15%
Student > Master 14 10%
Other 10 7%
Other 33 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 74 53%
Medicine and Dentistry 20 14%
Unspecified 12 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 3%
Other 23 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 102. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 July 2019.
All research outputs
#152,531
of 13,338,169 outputs
Outputs from Theoretical & Applied Genetics
#1
of 2,142 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,279
of 205,146 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Theoretical & Applied Genetics
#1
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,338,169 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,142 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 205,146 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them