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Imaging β-amyloid using [18F]flutemetamol positron emission tomography: from dosimetry to clinical diagnosis

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Nuclear Medicine & Molecular Imaging, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#15 of 1,594)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
2 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
48 Mendeley
Title
Imaging β-amyloid using [18F]flutemetamol positron emission tomography: from dosimetry to clinical diagnosis
Published in
European Journal of Nuclear Medicine & Molecular Imaging, October 2015
DOI 10.1007/s00259-015-3208-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kerstin Heurling, Antoine Leuzy, Eduardo R. Zimmer, Mark Lubberink, Agneta Nordberg

Abstract

In Alzheimer's disease (AD), the deposition of β-amyloid (Aβ) is hypothesized to result in a series of secondary neurodegenerative processes, leading ultimately to synaptic dysfunction and neuronal loss. Since the advent of the first Aβ-specific positron emission tomography (PET) ligand, (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B ([(11)C]PIB), several (18)F ligands have been developed that circumvent the limitations of [(11)C]PIB tied to its short half-life. To date, three such compounds have been approved for clinical use by the US and European regulatory bodies, including [(18)F]AV-45 ([(18)F]florbetapir; Amyvid™), [(18)F]-BAY94-9172 ([(18)F]florbetaben; Neuraceq™) and [(18)F]3'-F-PIB ([(18)F]flutemetamol; Vizamyl™). The present review aims to summarize and discuss the currently available knowledge on [(18)F]flutemetamol PET. As the (18)F analogue of [(11)C]PIB, [(18)F]flutemetamol may be of use in the differentiation of AD from related neurodegenerative disorders and may help with subject selection and measurement of target engagement in the context of clinical trials testing anti-amyloid therapeutics. We will also discuss its potential use in non-AD amyloidopathies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 48 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 25%
Researcher 9 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 15%
Other 5 10%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Other 11 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 44%
Unspecified 8 17%
Psychology 6 13%
Neuroscience 5 10%
Chemistry 3 6%
Other 5 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 October 2017.
All research outputs
#950,926
of 12,230,159 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Nuclear Medicine & Molecular Imaging
#15
of 1,594 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,016
of 250,620 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Nuclear Medicine & Molecular Imaging
#3
of 73 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,230,159 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,594 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 250,620 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 73 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.