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Loss of expression of DNA repair enzymes MGMT, hMLH1, and hMSH2 during tumor progression in gastric cancer.

Overview of attention for article published in Gastric Cancer, January 2003
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About this Attention Score

  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#11 of 142)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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30 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
6 Mendeley
Title
Loss of expression of DNA repair enzymes MGMT, hMLH1, and hMSH2 during tumor progression in gastric cancer.
Published in
Gastric Cancer, January 2003
DOI 10.1007/s10120-003-0213-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kitajima, Yoshihiko, Miyazaki, Kohji, Matsukura, Shiroh, Tanaka, Masayuki, Sekiguchi, Mutsuo

Abstract

Disorders of the DNA repair system that protects against alkylating mutagens are known to play an important role in carcinogenesis. We investigated the expression of the DNA repair enzyme that protects against alkylating mutagens, O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), and the mismatch repair (MMR) enzymes, hMLH1 and hMSH2, in 135 gastric cancer specimens by immunohistochemical means. The immunoreactivity of MGMT and MMR proteins correlated significantly with several clinicopathologic factors. The survival curve in 116 patients showed that a loss of MGMT or hMLH1, but not of hMSH2, correlated with a poor prognosis. Combined evaluation of MGMT and hMLH1 revealed that the survival of patients with negative status for both MGMT and hMLH1 was shortest. However, this significant association between patient survival and MGMT or hMLH1 expression disappeared when early and advanced cancers were separately analyzed, indicating that synchronous losses of MGMT and hMLH1 increase during tumor progression and stage. Further evaluation according to histologic type revealed that loss of MGMT, hMLH1, and hMSH2 expression significantly differed between early and advanced cancer in differentiated-type cancers. In contrast, in undifferentiated-type cancer, loss of MGMT and MMR expression was frequently found even in intramucosal (m) cancer, and no significant difference was found in loss of hMLH1 and hMSH2 between early and advanced cancer. These findings demonstrate that the reduced expression of MGMT, hMLH1, and hMSH2 in differentiated-type cancer may play an important role during tumor progression between the early and advanced stage. On the other hand, in undifferentiated-type cancer, loss of MGMT and the MMR proteins appears to be an important event at carcinogenesis or at an earlier step of tumor progression.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 6 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 1 17%
Other 1 17%
Student > Postgraduate 1 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 17%
Researcher 1 17%
Other 1 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 33%
Unspecified 1 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 October 2015.
All research outputs
#1,455,477
of 6,405,271 outputs
Outputs from Gastric Cancer
#11
of 142 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,309
of 194,810 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Gastric Cancer
#1
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,405,271 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 67th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 142 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 194,810 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.